Archive | July, 2019

We Want Your Opinion! Community Health Needs Assessment

Lexington Medical Center is conducting a community health needs assessment to better understand the health needs of Lexington County. Your responses will allow us to identify the leading and emerging health issues impacting our community, and address them.

The survey is anonymous and should take only approximately 10 minutes to complete. It’s our sincere hope that the information you provide will give us a glimpse of the health challenges that families in our community are facing, the needs they have for raising safe and healthy children, and the strengths existing within our community.

Here is a link to the survey. Please participate and share with your friends and neighbors.

Shining Bright in Three Stars

Lexington Medical Center’s cardiovascular program has earned an overall three-star rating for heart surgery from The Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS). Historically, less than 10 percent of heart programs in the United States and Canada achieved this prestigious designation, which recognizes quality patient and clinical outcome excellence. It’s the highest rating offered.

Open heart surgery at Lexington Medical Center

LMC began its complete cardiac care program in 2012 with expectations to perform about 100 open heart surgeries each year. But the program has far exceeded expectations. To date, LMC has performed more than 2,575 open heart surgeries – an average of 368 surgeries each year. As reflected in the three-star rating, patients have experienced excellent outcomes.

“The STS three-star rating is a prestigious accomplishment. It signifies a clear separation in quality from other programs,” said Jeffrey A. Travis, MD, of Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery. “We are honored to receive this designation again, and it represents a total team effort at Lexington Medical Center to provide the highest level of cardiac care to the Midlands.”

Jeffrey A. Travis, MD

The STS rating system is one of the most sophisticated and highly regarded overall measures of quality in health care, rating the benchmarked outcomes of cardiothoracic surgery programs across the United States and Canada. STS ranked LMC in the highest quality tier for 2018 after surveying more than 1,000 participating programs. The latest analysis of data for coronary artery bypass grafting procedures covered a one-year period, from January 1 to December 31, 2018.

“As the cardiovascular surgery outcomes coordinator, I view all our registry data on a daily basis. It is an honor and a privilege to be part of a team invested in making Lexington Medical Center the gold standard for cardiovascular care,” said Lisa Pittman, RN, BSN.

LMC has continued to build its heart program by offering a variety of new services, including transcatheter aortic valve replacement, known as TAVR. This state-of-the-art cardiovascular technology allows doctors to replace the aortic valve in patients without open heart surgery.

In addition, LMC has started to use insertable cardiac monitors, commonly known as loop recorders, to monitor heart rhythms around the clock. While versions of this technology have been available for years, new loop recorders are as small as a paper clip and require an incision of just a few millimeters. LMC also has an electrophysiology lab to treat patients with abnormal heart rhythms.

Importantly, quality oversight has been part of LMC’s affiliation with Duke Health for cardiovascular care. Twice each year, Duke cardiologists and heart surgeons come to LMC to review heart surgery and catheterization cases with physicians. The Duke Health physicians also provide ongoing peer review and evaluate new procedures for both the open heart and Catheterization Lab programs. When the hospital performs new procedures for the first time, a Duke representative is usually present for support.

LMC’s work with cardiovascular care doesn’t end with procedures and technology. It extends into the community with a comprehensive heart education program that teaches people about risk factors, prevention and cardiac technology. This outreach is especially important in South Carolina, where one out of every three people dies from cardiovascular disease.

Lexington Medical Center Marketing Vice President Honored in Hall of Fame

The Hospital Marketing National Hall of Fame inducted Mark Shelley, vice president of Marketing and Communications at Lexington Medical Center, at its annual ceremony in June. This honor recognizes individuals who have demonstrated extraordinary achievement in the advancement of marketing of hospitals or health care facilities.

Mark Shelley

“I am honored to be inducted into the Hospital Marketing National Hall of Fame,” Shelley said. “This recognition shows how well-respected Lexington Medical Center is by our peers in health care marketing and communications.”

Shelley has more than 35 years of experience in advertising and public relations. His work and leadership at Lexington Medical Center have been recognized with more than 500 international, national and regional advertising awards including Aster Awards, Healthcare Advertising Awards, Telly Awards, Davey Awards, and Videographer Awards. During his 12-year tenure at Lexington Medical Center, the hospital’s Marketing department has also been awarded eight national “Best in Show” awards.

“We’re proud to honor the accomplishments and creativity of each Hall of Fame Inductee,” said Bob Ehrlich, CEO of HMN Perspectives. “These individuals drive the industry forward, providing consumers with vital information on hospital services.”

HMN selected Mark for his work on outreach programs that help improve patient outcomes, support of community and fundraising events, and development of marketing campaigns that promote the hospital and its physicians, services and culture.

“As health care continues to evolve and new communication tools emerge, marketers who tell their stories creatively and deliver their messages honestly can not only inspire their audiences, but they can engage them. Truth is timeless – for the storyteller, the audience and the mission,” Shelley added.