Tag Archives: sick

Lexington Medical Center Welcomes Ronald F. Pendleton, DO, FAAFP

Lexington Medical Center is proud to welcome Ranald F. Pendleton to the hospital’s network of care. Dr. Pendleton will work at Harbison Medical Associates, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

A graduate of Salem State University in Salem, Massachusetts, Dr. Pendleton, earned his doctorate of osteopathic medicine from New York College of Osteopathic Medicine in Old Westbury, New York. He then completed his family medicine residency at Martin Army Community Hospital in Fort Benning, Georgia. During his residency, Dr. Pendleton received the U.S. Army Achievement Medal and the U.S. Army Commendation Medal.

Dr. Pendleton most recently treated patients of all ages and provided acute and chronic disease management at Family Medicine Centers of South Carolina in Columbia. He has more than 20 years of experience providing comprehensive family medical care. An American Board of Family Medicine Diplomate, Dr. Pendleton is a member of the American Academy of Family Physicians, the American Osteopathic Association and the South Carolina Academy of Family Physicians. He is also a National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners Diplomate.

Dr. Pendleton joins the board-certified physicians and nurse practitioners at Harbison Medical Associates to provide comprehensive care to families in the Irmo area. In addition to routine well and sick visits, the practice offers X-ray services, in-office laboratory services, echocardiograms, 24-hour heart monitoring and respiratory procedures.

Dr. Pendleton is accepting new patients.

Harbison Medical Associates
7033 St. Andrews Road, Suite 205
Columbia, SC 29212
(803) 749-1155

HarbisonMedical.com

It’s A Bad Flu Season

We’re in the middle of a tough flu season. In fact, Lexington Medical Center doctors say it may be the worst flu season in South Carolina since 2010.

In October, the Lexington Medical Center Emergency department saw 15 flu cases; in November, 80; in December, 550. And, in just the first week of January – 300 flu cases.

“The flu is a very serious illness,” said Daniel L. Avosso, MD, MBA, FACEP, FACHE, medical director of the Emergency department at Lexington Medical Center. “It causes hospitalization and death. And its symptoms last longer than other illnesses.”

Unoftunately, Dr. Avosso says this year’s flu vaccine may not be as effective as we had hoped.

“Each year, we have to predict what vaccine to make. Some years, we get it right. Others, we don’t,” he said. The accuracy of the vaccine determines the severity of the flu season.”

However, Dr. Avosso advises that patients should still get a flu shot. That’s because if you’re exposed to the flu after having the vaccine, your symptoms may not be as severe.

It’s especially important for people with underlying conditions to have a flu vaccine. That includes people with asthma, diabetes, epilepsy, congestive heart failure, neurological issues and who are bed bound. It also includes the very young, pregnant women and the elderly population. That’s because these groups are most likely to be hospitalized with flu complications.

The flu is spread through small microscopic droplets. You can contract the flu from someone who is as many as six feet away from you. You can also catch it from touching the same door knob as someone with the flu. It’s important to be especially careful in crowds.

Daniel Avosso, MD

The flu tends to peak this time of year because people are stuck inside in cold weather spreading germs from one person to another as opposed to the warmer weather months where people enjoy the outdoors.

If you’re exposed to the flu, you’re likely to develop flu symptoms between one and four days later. If you have the flu, you were contagious the day before your symptoms appeared and up to a week later.

Tamiflu is a medicine that can help shorten the duration of the flu and help with symptoms. But you need to begin taking it between one and two days after symptoms appear. And because it can cause side effects, some doctors recommend it only for a select group of patients.

The flu is a virus – so antibiotics won’t help. In addition to Tamiflu, it’s important to stay hydrated, rest and treat your symptoms with over-the-counter medication. With proper care, the flu will eventually run its course.