Tag Archives: Judi Gatson

The Dangers of Carbon Monoxide

According to the American Red Cross, more than 15,200 people go to hospital emergency rooms each year to be treated for carbon monoxide poisoning.

And, approximately 400 people die each year from carbon monoxide poisoning.

Sadly, two people in Columbia died from carbon monoxide poisoning in their apartment complex this month.

In this WIS-TV interview with news anchor Judi Gatson, Dr. Alex Kranc of Lexington Medical Center’s Emergency department talks about what carbon monoxide is and how to recognize the signs of poisoning.

Carbon monoxide can build up to lethal levels in just a few days. Victims may complain of feeling like they have the flu or feeling faint after exposure. They can also have headaches or dizziness. Ultimately, high concentrations of carbon monoxide can starve the heart and brain of oxygen.

carbon monoxide detector

Carbon monoxide can be found in a closed garage with a car running, gas appliances in the kitchen, basements with improperly installed furnaces, hot water heaters or dryers, and gas or solid fuel stoves in living rooms.

Adequate ventilation in cold weather and using caution with heat sources can prevent the buildup of carbon monoxide gas and help reduce fire hazards.

It’s also important to have a carbon monoxide detector in your home. However, the American Red Cross reports that only one in 10 homes has one.

Hey Girlfriends! Register for Heart and Sole

On your mark, get set, go! Join us for the Lexington Medical Center Heart and Sole Women’s Five Miler on Saturday, April 21 in downtown Columbia. This women-only event features a five-mile run, a five-mile walk and a three-mile-walk. In its 17th year, Heart and Sole is designed to celebrate women and the power of a healthy lifestyle, and to raise awareness that heart disease is the #1 killer of women. With a strong commitment to a comprehensive cardiovascular program at hospital, Lexington Medical Center is pleased to be the title sponsor.

The start line is at Arsenal Hill on Laurel Street. The opening ceremony is at 7:30 a.m; the 5-mile run and walk begin at 8:00 a.m; and the 3-mile walk starts at 8:05 a.m. The finish line is at the bottom of Finlay Park on Taylor Street. Each woman will receive a red rose and a finisher’s medal as she crosses the finish line. A post-event celebration and expo featuring Lexington Medical Center clinicians as well as WIS-TV news anchors Dawndy Mercer-Plank, Judi Gatson and other WIS-TV personalities will take place in Finlay Park until 10:30 a.m.

“We’re proud to host the Heart and Sole Women’s Five Miler because it not only encourages physical activity a healthy lifestyle, it also calls attention to the issue of heart disease — the biggest health threat women face today,” said Dr. Amy Epps, cardiologist with Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

Launched by the Carolina Marathon Association in 2002, the Lexington Medical Center Heart and Sole Women’s Five Miler is South Carolina’s first women-only road race. It has grown from fewer than 400 female participants in its first year to more than 1,300 today. Sponsored in conjunction with WIS-TV, the race offers women of all athletic abilities the opportunity to participate in a comforting, supportive environment. Elite athletes, as well as first-timers, enjoy the unique event.

Women who have participated in Heart and Sole in previous years will recognize changes in the course this year. The growth of Columbia’s Soda City Market on Main Street has made the downtown area on Saturday mornings busier than ever before. As a result, the course will now go down Marion Street, incorporate historic sections of the city and eliminate the Gervais Street hill. These changes will create a flatter, faster course. Additionally, the race will begin 30 minutes earlier than previous years.

For more information, including a course map, packet pick-up, race day and awards information, and to register, visit HeartAndSolerun.com or HeartAndSoleWalk.com.

We hope to see you at the start line!

#JustSayKnow with High Intensity Interval Training

High Intensity Interval Training (known as HIIT) can boost your heart health. Rich Maddox, personal trainer at Health Directions, Lexington Medical Center’s health and wellness gym, talked about it on WIS-TV with Judi Gatson this week. And, Lyn Pernell, personal trainer with Health Directions, demonstrated the exercises. Check it out!


These exercises help to work the heart muscle and make it stronger. It also helps to improve blood flow through the veins and arteries, decreasing your risk of heart disease.

These are intense exercises for a short period of time with a short period of rest. The workout takes 10 to 30 minutes, depending on your fitness level. Exercises can include cycling, swimming, running and more.