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Dr. Melanie Seybt Answers Questions about Thyroid Disease

This week, Dr. Melanie Seybt of Lexington ENT & Allergy was a guest on WIS-TV with news anchor Dawndy Mercer Plank to talk about thyroid disease.

In Part One of her guest appearance, she talked about the prevalence of thyroid disease and why it affects so many women. You can heard what she said in the link below.

In Part 2, she answered viewers’ social media questions about thyroid disease.

Want to know more? Dr. Seybt will give a FREE lecture called “Advances in Surgical Management of Thyroid Disease” on Monday, April 28 in the Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium on the hospital campus. The lecture is free and open to the public. Attendees will also have the opportunity to ask the doctor questions.

Congratulations, Best Doctors!

Twenty-two Lexington Medical Center physicians have been selected as “2014 Midlands Best Doctors.” These physicians have been selected by their peers as outstanding members of their field.

You can learn more about them and the prestigious recognition in this month’s edition of Columbia Metropolitan Magazine.

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In addition, one of the selected doctors, Dr. Steve Madden of Lexington Oncology, is featured in an article about chemotherapy in the magazine. You can read the article here.

LMC to Offer Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

This year, Lexington Medical Heart Center will begin offering transcatheter aortic valve replacement, known as TAVR. This state-of-the-art cardiovascular technology allows doctors to replace the aortic valve without open heart surgery.

Dr. Robert Leonardi of Lexington Cardiology

Dr. Robert Leonardi of Lexington Cardiology

“TAVR is the single most important advance in interventional cardiology since coronary angioplasty,” said Dr. Robert Leonardi of Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

He will perform TAVR procedures as part of a highly skilled cardiac care team that includes Dr. Robert Malanuk of Lexington Cardiology and Dr. Jeffrey Travis of Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, as well as nurses, technicians and a cardiovascular anesthesiologist.

Currently, TAVR is for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are not candidates for open heart surgery because of their age, history of heart disease, or other health issues.

Patients with severe aortic stenosis have a narrowed aortic valve that does not allow blood to flow efficiently. As the heart works harder to pump enough blood through the smaller opening in the valve, the heart eventually becomes weak. Over time, that can lead to life-threatening heart problems.


TAVR offers a less invasive option than open heart surgery. To replace the diseased aortic valve, the new aortic valve is compressed into a tube-like device called a delivery catheter that’s slightly wider than a pencil. Doctors insert the delivery catheter and the new aortic valve into an artery and thread the catheter through the body to the inside of the diseased aortic valve. Then, doctors deploy the new valve from the delivery catheter inside the diseased aortic valve, which becomes the anchor for the new valve. The new valve is functional immediately and normal blood flow is restored.

Lexington Medical Heart Center will use the Edwards SAPIEN Transcatheter Heart Valve. It’s made of bovine tissue with a stainless steel frame. The TAVR procedure takes less than two hours.

“The main benefit is that patients feel better and live longer,” Dr. Leonardi said.

Studies show that TAVR reduces the mortality rate in patients by 20% in the first year after the procedure.

“Patients often want to know if there’s something we can do to make them feel better,” he added. “TAVR allows that to happen.”

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For more information on Lexington Medical Center’s complete cardiac care program, visit LexMed.com.