Tag Archives: Lexington Oncology

And Then There Were Three!

Lexington Medical Center’s commitment to meeting the health care needs of its community continues with the completion of Lexington Medical Park 3. Located at 155 North Hospital Drive, this five-story, 175,460-sq-ft medical office building on the hospital’s main campus opened in August. It will be the new home of Lexington Brain and Spine Institute, Lexington Women’s Care and Lexington Oncology.

Lexington Brain and Spine Institute occupies suites 100 and 200, which make up half the building’s first floor and all its second floor. The new office features digital X-ray, four procedure rooms, a physical therapy gym and private physical therapy rooms. Lexington Brain and Spine Institute moved into its new location August 15.

Lexington Medical 3 building.

“Our new office space has nearly 40,000 square feet that will allow us to provide comprehensive and multidisciplinary care from day one of a patient’s symptoms to resolution. We have physical therapy, imaging, physiatry, pain management and neurosurgical services all within one office, providing both convenience and high quality medical and surgical care. We look forward to showing our new office to our existing and future patients,” said C. Philip Toussaint, MD, FAANS, neurosurgeon at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute.

Lexington Women’s Care moves into its new office on September 18. The practice, located in Suite 300, feature four labs, four ultrasound rooms, education and Centering™ rooms, and two procedure rooms. Suite 300 occupies the entire third floor of Lexington Medical Park 3.

Lexington Medical 3 building.

Lexington Oncology plans to move to the fourth and fifth floors (suites 400 and 500) of the new medical park in March 2018. With more than 60,000 square feet, the practice will be able to expand its infusion area from 40 infusion chairs to 68 infusion chairs, add another chemotherapy hood and an additional non-chemotherapy hood to the IV pharmacy and provide oral chemotherapy and support medications to patients through an in-office retail pharmacy.

Lexington Oncology will also add a 64-slice CT scanner and a five-ring PET/CT scanner, and expand its laboratory to accommodate future equipment for hematology, chemistry and genetic tumor marker testing. 

“Lexington Oncology is the only nationally certified Quality Oncology Practice Initiative® practice and Duke Medicine affiliate in the Midlands. These expansions will allow us to provide a multitude of enhanced and new services under one roof to better meet the needs of our growing patient population,” said Jon Bridges, MHA, CMPE, practice administrator for Lexington Oncology and Lexington Radiation Oncology.

A Young Mother’s Cancer Story

Imagine learning you have Stage 4 cancer at age 29 – you’re a newlywed and the mom of a little boy. Scarlet Lutz of Chapin has colon cancer that has spread to her liver. Her condition is considered terminal. She shared her story in this WIS-TV news report hoping to help others recognize their symptoms and see their doctor promptly. Scarlet’s doctor is Steven Madden, MD, of Lexington Oncology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, who shares his insights on the disease.

 

The incidence of colon cancer is rapidly increasing in young people. Doctors aren’t sure why, but think it may have to do with diet – including eating a lot of red meat and processed foods – rising obesity rates, smoking and sedentary lifestyles.

Typically, doctors recommend a colon cancer screening called a colonoscopy at age 50 – or younger if you have a family history of the disease. Also – regardless of age – talk to your doctor if you have symptoms including abdominal cramps, blood in the stool, changes in the appearance of the stool, or changes in bowel habits.

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death – behind lung cancer. It’s also preventable – and treatable when detected early. Unfortunately, if it’s not caught early and spreads to other parts of the body, it can be difficult to cure. And, more than 60% of people in South Carolina who should have a colonoscopy report never having the screening.

For more information about cancer service at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Cancer.

Colon Cancer Increasing in Young People

The incidence of colon cancer is increasing in young people. In fact, Dr. Perrie Ryan of Lexington Oncology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, says studies show that by 2030, 90% of 20-somethings will develop colon cancer in their lifetime. Why? Listen to what he says in the WLTX interview below.

 

While there are many risk factors for colon cancer, Dr. Ryan says that factors including obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, eating a lot of red meat or processed meat and diabetes in younger people may be contributing to the increase in young people.

Each year, about 2,000 people in South Carolina are diagnosed with colon cancer and about 800 die from the disease. In fact, it’s the second deadliest form of cancer behind lung cancer. But it’s also preventable – and treatable when detected early. The best way to prevent colon cancer is to have a colonoscopy. That test can locate and remove polyps before they turn into cancer. Talk to your doctor about when you should begin colon cancer screening.

For more information about cancer services at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Cancer.