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Coronavirus and Pregnancy

Pregnant women may have many questions about coronavirus. In this WLTX interview, Dr. Paul Browne talks about what expectant mothers should know about the virus. Dr. Browne is an OB/GYN at Lexington Maternal Fetal Medicine, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. He specializes in high-risk pregnancies.

Our First Baby of 2020

Congratulations to United States Air Force Captain Denise on the birth of baby boy Trevor on January 1 at 2:50 a.m. — our hospital’s first delivery of 2020! Mom was on the dance floor at a wedding reception in Columbia when she went into labor on New Year’s Eve. Baby Trevor was also welcomed with love by dad Tremayne and big sister Zuri. What a beautiful family!

Lexington Medical Center has welcomed more than 100,000 babies into the world since our hospital opened in 1971. To find a doctor who delivers at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/OBGYN.

Help for Couples Experiencing Infertility

Infertility is a unique medical diagnosis for doctors because it involves a couple rather than just an individual. For couples under age 35, infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 12 months of unprotected intercourse. For couples over age 35, it’s six months.

In this WLTX interview inside Lexington Medical Center’s new patient care tower, Dr. Blake Chapman of Lexington Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, talks about diagnosing infertility and helping couples to welcome a baby.

According to Dr. Chapman, young, healthy, fertile couples only have a 15 to 20 percent chance of conceiving each menstrual cycle. After three months, approximately 50 percent of those couples would become pregnant. After 12 months, it jumps to 85 to 90 percent.

That means that approximately 10 to 15 percent of couples fall into the category of infertility and should see their health care provider.

About 1/3 of infertility is female factor infertility. Causes could be something a woman has been born with that’s making it difficult to conceive, a history of pelvic infections or surgery, or some medications she’s taking.

About 1/3 of infertility is male factor infertility. Causes could be a man has been born with something that’s making it difficult to conceive, his body doesn’t transport sperm correctly, or he’s had pelvic trauma or pelvic radiation.

The last 1/3 of infertility is undefined. That means doctors aren’t sure of the cause and help patients pursue other avenues to have a baby.

If you’re considering pregnancy, Dr. Chapman recommends seeing your physician for pre-conception counseling, which includes a look at your medical history and any medications you’re taking. This type of patient education plays an important role in optimizing chances of natural fertility.