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Urgent Care or ER: Where Should You Go?

The next time you have a cold, the flu, broken bone… or if you or a loved one is experiencing chest pain or stroke symptoms, where should you go? Urgent Care can provide treatment for a lot of conditions. But for others, it’s important to go to the ER or call 911. In this WIS Health U news report, Dr. Don Moore of Lexington Medical Center explains the difference.


Generally speaking, urgent care centers provide treatment for less serious illness or injuries when your primary care physician is unavailable. They include: earaches, sore throats, sprains and strains, cold and flu symptoms, pink eye, sinus infections, seasonal allergies, urinary tract infections, mild asthma, stomach flu, simple cuts or wounds, and fever without a rash.

Call 911 if you or a loved one is experiencing a life-threatening emergency such as a heart attack, stroke, a severe injury or if you’re having trouble breathing. Conditions that may require immediate care in the ER include: loss of consciousness, signs of a heart attack or stroke including chest pain, chest discomfort and shortness of breath, uncontrolled or excessive bleeding, coughing or vomiting blood, a head injury, sudden or unexpected paralysis, sudden onset of severe pain or abdominal pain, poisoning, overdose, violent injuries from gunshots or stabbing and emotional stress or suicidal feelings.

Lexington Medical Center operates five Urgent Care facilities around Lexington County and treats more than 85,000 patients each year in its Emergency department. Visit LexMed.com

Women’s Health Through the Decades

Carolina Women’s Physicians, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The practice has provided comprehensive obstetric and gynecology care for women in the Midlands for a decade. In recognition of that milestone, the practice offers tips for women in all decades of life.
 
20s
Nearly 20 million cases of sexually transmitted diseases occur each year. Most happen in women under the age of 25. Because some have no symptoms, it’s important for women in their 20s to see a health care provider regularly. In addition, symptoms such as odor, discharge and pelvic pain require immediate attention. Some infections can cause complications that could lead to infertility. Doctors can perform simple tests to make a diagnosis and prescribe treatment.
 
30s
Premenstrual syndrome peaks for women in their 30s for several reasons. First, women’s bodies are not as forgiving compared with earlier in life.  Secondly, women in their 30s are at higher risk for depression, stress and obesity. And, it’s more difficult to clear excess calories from alcohol and caffeine, which can result in lack of sleep. Making simple changes to a daily routine can prevent premenstrual syndrome. Get eight hours of sleep each night, exercise 3 to 4 times per week, eat nutritious foods and pay attention to calories.
 
40s
The five years leading up to menopause can be filled with irritability, memory changes and sleep problems. Metabolism can begin to slow down and menstrual cycles will fluctuate. These are symptoms of perimenopause and can be treated with hormonal and non-hormonal methods. It’s also important to eat a diet that’s high in protein and low in carbohydrates to diminish the risk of heart disease and diabetes.
 
50s
Many women believe that changes will slow down and they will start to relax in this season of life. However, the risk of depression can increase and is very common in women in their 50s. Symptoms such as changes in appetite, shortened sleep cycles, weight gain and apathy can be signs of depression and anxiety. A combination of medicine and therapy are the most effective ways to treat chronic and situational depression. Remaining engaged in long-time friendships, traveling and exercise can also help.
 
Carolina Women’s Physicians has locations in West Columbia and Irmo. Visit CarolinaWomensPhysicians.com or call (803) 936 – 7590 for an appointment.