Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. First, Amy Kinard.

Amy Kinard
River Bluff High School Nurse

At just 34 years old, Amy found a lump during a routine self-breast exam. At the time, she was a nurse at Lexington Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

amy-k“That self-breast exam helped me detect my cancer early, which made my treatment and prognosis better.”

She was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in-situ, stage 1 with no lymph node involvement. While her cancer was not progesterone or estrogen driven, she tested positive for an overexpression of HER2-Nu, a protein that makes cancer more aggressive. Amy had no family history of cancer, and her genetic testing was negative.

amy-kinard009b“I strongly encourage all women to do self-breast exams, get their annual mammogram, be familiar with their bodies and see their doctor immediately if they notice the slightest change. You have to be your own biggest advocate.”

Amy has been a survivor for nine years now. Today, she’s a nurse at River Bluff High School.

“Five years after filming the Pink Glove Dance, people still recognize me and make the connection with the video. I am proud of the work Lexington Medical Center did to bring awareness to breast cancer and the impact it had on our community. These are memories I will cherish for a lifetime.”

To watch Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance from 2011, visit this link on the hospital’s You Tube channel.

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