Archive | August, 2015

Super Lice

South Carolina is one of several states across the country with “super lice,” a nit that’s resistant to traditional over the counter remedies. WIS-TV reporter Sam Bleiweis interviewed Dr. Jeremy Crisp of Lexington Family Practice Northeast, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice about the pesky bugs – and what parents need to know about nixing the nits.

Wine on the River

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation’s Women of Hope will host its annual “Wine on the River” party at the West Columbia Riverwalk Park and Stone River on Saturday, August 29, 2015 from 7:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m.

Surrounded by the beautiful sights and sounds along the Congaree River, “Wine on the River” features wine tasting, craft beer tasting, cuisine from Midlands restaurants and musical entertainment from Jim LeBlanc. The event benefits Lexington Medical Center Foundation programs and services.

Ben Arnold Beverage Company will provide a variety of red and white wines. Guests can also sample delicious food from local restaurants including Alodia’s, Bogarts, Café Strudel, Capital City Club, Carolina Café, Delucca’s, Famously Frozen, Ms. B’s, Salsarita’s, Travinia and Whole Foods.

In addition, attendees can learn how to join Women of Hope, a women’s giving circle that is part of the Lexington Medical Center Foundation. Established in 2011, Women of Hope identifies health issues in the Midlands and works to bring about positive change. 



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Proceeds from “Wine on the River” will benefit Lexington Medical Center Foundation initiatives that are important to women and children. That includes the Cancer Care Fund, which assists oncology patients in need with programs and services such as prescription medications, preventative screenings, post-surgical kits and financial resources. It also includes the Women and Children Fund, which provides basic newborn care items, doula education and infant CPR training.

Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program is affiliated with Duke Medicine to provide state-of-the-art cancer care for cancer patients in our community. The hospital diagnoses approximately 250 breast cancer patients each year, with a breast program is accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program also has accreditation with commendation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.


Each year, “Wine on the River” boasts a sold-out crowd of approximately 700 people and raises nearly $20,000 for cancer services in our community.

Tickets for “Wine on the River” are $40 in advance and $50 at the entrance. To purchase tickets, call (803) 791-2540 or go to lmcfoundation.com and click on the Eventbrite link on that page. Food, wine and beer tastings are included in the ticket price. There will also be a cash bar available.

The vineyard sponsors for “Wine on the River” are L.A. Barrier and Sons Inc., B&T Sand Company, IMIC Hotels, Lexington Oncology and Lexington Radiation Oncology.

Additional sponsors are Apex Financial LLC, BB&T, Burkett, Burkett & Burkett, Carolina Women’s Physicians, Comporium, Event Management, First Citizens Bank, Lexington Orthopaedics, Midland’s Pest Control, Morningside of Lexington, Pathology Associates of Lexington, Peralta Woodworks, Prudential-Coke Floyd, Southern Surgical Group, Stone River, Time Warner Cable, United Hospice and Wingate by Wyndham Lexington.

GMOs – What’s The Latest?

by Jennifer Benedetto MS, RD, LD, CNSC at LMC

The United States House of Representatives recently passed a bill that will block states from requiring GMO food labels. What are GMOs? Should we be concerned that these items are hidden in our food supply?

CornGMOs are genetically modified organisms.These plants, animals or microorganisms have had their genes changed in a way that is not possible in nature. These changes make the organisms thrive in their environment. For example, GM crops are produced by transferring a gene responsible for a beneficial characteristic into the DNA of a host plant’s cells. The cells within the seeds grow into a mature plant that displays the desired characteristics. Plants have been changed to be insect resistant, drought resistant, and virus resistant. GMOs are argued to be sustainable crops that will be available to feed a growing population.

SoybeansThe first GMO crops became commercially available in 1996. The major commercially available genetic engineered crops include alfalfa, canola, corn, cotton, papaya, soy, squash, sugar beet and sweet corn. GMO varieties became the majority of the US corn crop in 2005 and the majority of the soybean crop in 2000. It has been reported that “trillions of GM meals” have been consumed in the US. It is estimated that there is at least 1 GMO in a given processed food. High fructose corn syrup is a frequent GMO ingredient. But since these foods are not monitored or labeled, there is no way to study patterns of consumption and their impacts. Even though the vast majority of scientists say that eating GMO’s is safe, their inclusion in the food supply is controversial. In a January poll, 57% of Americans feared that GM foods are unsafe.

GMO SealUnfortunately it seems the jury is still out on the safety of GMOs. For the time being, the only way to know that you are avoiding GMOs is to either eat organic foods or find foods with the “Non-GMO Project Verified” seal. The USDA National Organic Program prohibits the use of GMOs in any product that carries the “certified organic” label. The “Non-GMO Project” is an independent verification system dedicated to identifying products made without GMOs. A list of tested and approved products can be found on their website: www.nongmoproject.org.

PapayaSo for now, the government is not going to require GMO labeling, but with a little leg work, you can find non-GMO foods at your local supermarket.