Tag Archives: stroke

Lexington Medical Center Honored for Excellence in Stroke Care

Lexington Medical Center received a “Gold Plus” Quality Achievement Award for stroke care from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke program. The hospital also achieved Target: Stroke Elite Honor Roll recognition this year.

The “Gold Plus” award is the highest honor bestowed to hospitals for stroke care and recognizes commitment and success in implementing excellent care for stroke patients. The honor goes to hospitals with excellent adherence to stroke quality indicators and measures, including use of proven medications, therapy, cholesterol-reducing drugs and smoking cessation, all aimed at reducing death and disability, and improving the lives of stroke patients.

To qualify for the Target: Stroke Elite Honor Roll, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. At Lexington Medical Center, nearly 80 percent of stroke patients receive tPA within 60 minutes of arrival.

“We are very excited about our advancements in stroke care at Lexington Medical Center. The Stroke Committee members work diligently to implement evidence-based practices in achieving optimal outcomes for the patients we serve. Clinicians from many disciplines work together to provide patients with the highest quality of stroke care,” said Stephanie Davis, RN, BSN, MHA, clinical outcomes coordinator, Stroke Program manager.

Lexington Medical Center also maintains its certification as a Primary Stroke Center with Det Norske Veritas Healthcare, Inc. This certification program recognizes organizations that follow the best practices for stroke care. Achieving Primary Stroke Center certification demonstrates LMC’s dedication to promoting better outcomes for patients.

“Our program’s success is a result of the commitment and passion every individual demonstrates in caring for these patients, both at the bedside and behind the scenes. We truly appreciate each team member’s valuable contributions to the Stroke Program and the excellent care they provide to our patients,” she said.

Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic Welcomes Katie Willett Dahlberg, MD

Katie Willett Dahlberg, MD

Lexington Medical Center proudly welcomes Katie Willett Dahlberg, MD, to Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

Dr. Dahlberg joins the board-certified physicians and highly skilled staff at Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic. The practice provides comprehensive care in the evaluation, monitoring, prevention and treatment of cognitive and general neurological disorders, including nervous system inflammatory diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, early and late onset dementia, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, seizures and epilepsy, and migraines, among other conditions.

A graduate of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Dr. Dahlberg earned her medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine in Columbia. She then completed her neurology residency at USC, where she also served as chief resident.

Dr. Dahlberg is a member of the American Academy of Neurology with certifications in advanced cardiac and basic life support, as well as Allergan Botox® training. Before providing comprehensive care for disorders of the nervous system in private practice, she completed work as a sub-investigator for two research studies: one related to secondary stroke prevention and the other focused on treatment of ischemic stroke with mild symptoms.

Dr. Dahlberg is accepting new patients.

146 North Hospital Drive, Suite 500
West Columbia, SC 29169
(803) 936-7076
SENeurologyandMemory.com

Spot the Signs of Stroke

Which of the following is a sign of stroke?
Facial drooping.
Arm weakness.
Slurred speech.
The answer? All of the above. And if you see someone with the symptoms of a stroke, it’s important to act quickly.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. When that happens, part of the brain can’t get the oxygen it needs and starts to die. If it lasts for a long time, there can be permanent damage.

Risk factors for stroke include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, smoking, excessive alcohol use and atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat.

South Carolina has a high rate of stroke. In fact, it’s the fourth leading cause of death in the state. Statistics show that more than 20,000 people suffer a stroke in South Carolina each year, and more than 2,500 people die from a stroke.

“South Carolina is in what’s known as the ‘Stroke Belt’,” said Douglas Sinclair, DO, a neurologist with Southeastern Neurology and Memory Clinic, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. “Our state has a bad combination of factors including smoking, poor diet, and not seeking routine medical care that makes us have a higher prevalence of stroke than the rest of the country. Here in the South, we deep fry pickles.”

When it comes to stroke, experts say to think “F-A-S-T” to look for symptoms and respond.
F: Facial drooping
A: Arm weakness
S: Slurred speech
T: Time to call 9-1-1

A stroke is a medical emergency that requires immediate care. If someone shows stroke symptoms, call 9-1-1 and get them to a hospital right away. Also note the last time the person did not have any stroke symptoms. Doctors may treat the patient with a drug called tPA that busts clots. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability.

Douglas Sinclair, DO

“Stroke patients often do not realize they’ve had a stroke and resist the idea of going to the Emergency department,” Dr. Sinclair said. “Unlike heart attacks, the typical stroke causes no pain and patients often want to go to bed or take a nap. If you think you or a loved one is having a stroke, call 9-1-1.”

Ways to lower stroke risk include quitting smoking, talking to your doctor about treating high blood pressure or high cholesterol, and following a healthy diet such as the DASH or Mediterranean diet.

A stroke can happen at any age. While most cases of stroke are in patients older than 65, a third of all strokes in the United States occur in patients younger than that. Stroke can also run in families.

Lexington Medical Center is a certified Primary Stroke Center, which recognizes that the hospital follows the best practices for stroke care. It has also received a “Gold Plus” Quality Achievement Award for stroke care from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get with the Guidelines Stroke program and qualified for the Target: Stroke Honor Roll.

For more information about stroke care at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Stroke.