Tag Archives: Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic

Think F-A-S-T for Stroke

May is Stroke Awareness Month. South Carolina has one of the highest rates of stroke in the United States. In this WLTX interview, Dr. Katherine Dahlberg, neurologist with Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic at Lexington Medical Center, explains what happens inside the body when you have a stroke and how you can prevent one from happening.

When it comes so symptoms of a stroke, remember the acronym F-A-S-T. Look for Facial drooping, Arm weakness, Slurred speech, and know it’s Time to call 911. Prompt treatment is paramount in order to minimize negative stroke outcomes. Lexington Medical Center is a Primary Stroke Center, which means the hospital has demonstrated excellence in treating stroke patients promptly and successfully. Visit LexMed.com/Stroke.

Breaking Down Bell’s Palsy

Bell’s Palsy causes sudden paralysis on one side of your face, making it look like your face is drooping. It happened to WIS-TV news anchor Mary King. In this story with Dr. Katie Dahlberg of Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic and Dr. Douglas Addy of Lexington Women’s Care, Mary shares her experience and hopes to help others.

Can You Recognize A Stroke?

Face drooping.
Arm weakness.
Slurred Speech.

These are the signs of a stroke. Would you recognize them? In this WLTX interview, Dr. Katie Dahlberg, neurologist at Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, explains this dangerous condition and talks about treatment and prevention.

Lexington Medical Center is a Primary Stroke Center. The hospital has received a “Gold Plus” Quality Achievement Award for stroke care from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke program. And, the hospital achieved Target: Stroke Elite Honor Roll recognition this year.

The “Gold Plus” award is the highest honor bestowed to hospitals for stroke care and recognizes commitment and success in implementing excellent care for stroke patients. The honor goes to hospitals with excellent adherence to stroke quality indicators and measures, including use of proven medications, therapy, cholesterol-reducing drugs and smoking cessation, all aimed at reducing death and disability, and improving the lives of stroke patients.

To qualify for the Target: Stroke Elite Honor Roll, hospitals must meet quality measures developed to reduce the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-busting drug tissue plasminogen activator. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. At LMC, nearly 80 percent of stroke patients receive tPA within 60 minutes of arrival.

Learn more at LexMed.com/Stroke