Tag Archives: South Carolina

LMC Swansea Rehearses Emergency Response


Swansea, SC (WLTX) — During a health emergency one second can save a life. That is why Lexington Medical Center is making sure each one counts when it comes to caring for patient in rural areas of the Midlands.

Time counts when it comes to a heart attack and registered nurse and Community Medical Center Clinical Coordinator Darrell Tedder knows that first hand.

“I had a little burning chest pain. I thought it was reflux, took an antacid, didn’t work,” said Tedder.

That happened in 2008. He recognized the situation as serious and called his own ambulance.

“They took me to the hospital, where they opened me up, put a stint in, actually three, and I’m a survivor today,” said Tedder.

Now he and other medical professionals at the Lexington Medical Center’s Community Medical Center in Swansea are working to make sure those far away from the hospital’s main campus, can get to that care more quickly.

“The quicker you get somebody to a quick assessment, identification of the problem and get them to an area where they can be treated the less muscle that dies or is actually damaged,” he said.

The Swansea Community Medical Center held a drill to rehearse their response to a person having the most serious kind of heart attack called a STEMI, or ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. During a STEMI an artery is completely blocked off and part of the heart can begin to die. While the center can handle many kinds of medical emergencies, Dr. Donald Langston Powell says when they recognize a STEMI they begin procedures to get a patient to the main campus as soon as possible.

“When we call the helicopter or when we call the ambulance, there are personnel that are trained to take care of people. They’re all certified in advance cardiac life support and have all the tools necessary to take care of that patient,” said Powell.

While the community center is somewhat limited in what it can provide, Powell says receiving medications and care as they prepare to transport someone, is better than risking an attempt to reach the hospital on your own.

Happy Respiratory Care Week

LMC would like to send a heartfelt thank you to all of the Respiratory Therapists in our network of care for the compassionate care you give our patients everyday.

Local woman’s cancer battle uncovers family link

FROM WIS TV

A Midlands woman’s fight against breast cancer led to a discovery that may save the lives of her sisters and daughters.

Click for Video: wistv.com – Columbia, South Carolina

Kelly, Kathryn and Ashley

Kelly, Kathryn and Ashley

 

Kathryn Robinson’s cancer battle started more than two years ago.  ”I was preparing to go to work, and while I was in the shower I just accidentally felt a lump in my breast,” said Robinson.

It had been less than two months since Robinson’s yearly mammogram, but she knew something wasn’t right. “I called the doctor and went in that afternoon,” said Robinson. “He sent me in for an ultrasound that next Monday.”

Just a few days after the ultrasound Robinson was diagnosed with breast cancer and life immediately changed for her and her family.

“When my mom was diagnosed and she talked about getting genetic testing done, that’s the first time I had ever heard of the gene,” said Robinson’s 24 year-old daughter, Ashley Lyons.

Robinson’s family quickly learned about the BRCA gene malformation. It’s hereditary and when present greatly increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. In the midst of chemo, Kathryn tested positive for the gene.

“I had eight rounds of chemotherapy, and I was scheduled to do radiation after that, but because I was positive with the BRCA2 gene, they did a bilateral mastectomy,” said Robinson.

Doctors at Lexington Medical Center recommended the mastectomy and a hysterectomy in hopes of eliminating Robinson’s future cancer risks. They also advised her family to get tested for the gene.

“I had one sister that wasn’t interested in getting tested and a younger sister that I can usually persuade to do just about anything… she went and got tested,” said Robinson.

As it turned out, Robinson’s sister Kelly Moore also tested positive for the gene malformation. “I feel like I’m the lucky one,” said Moore. “Kathryn helped to educate me, and I had all of her valuable information for what she had gone through.

Moore chose to have her ovaries removed as a preventive measure, and is now getting more frequent breast exams. For Robinson’s daughter Ashley, the decision was more difficult.

“At first, I did not want to know,” said Ashley. “I did not want to be tested.” But Ashley says her older sister talked her into being tested for the gene. While her older sister does not have the BRCA malformation, Ashley does.

“At first I was like how do you test positive and do nothing about it…so that was kind of hard in the beginning,” said Ashley.

But medical oncologist Dr. Steve Madden at Lexington Medical center says at Ashley’s young age it’s okay not to undergo preventive surgery as long as she’s pro-active. “As long as you’re aware, you’re going to be on top of anything and catch it much earlier if it develops at all,” added Dr. Madden.

Kathryn has been a survivor now for two years. Her family calls her a lifesaver. “She was very positive, and she inspired all of us to take a fighting approach to it,” said Moore.

Dr. Madden says doctors usually advise anyone diagnosed with breast cancer who is under the age of 50 to be tested for the gene. They also advise immediate family members of breast cancer patients to be tested, as well.

Click for the full video: WIS TV VIDEO