Tag Archives: South Carolina

Here We Grow! Lexington Medical Center Breaks Ground on Clinical Expansion

Lexington Medical Center held a groundbreaking ceremony on Monday, May 9, 2016 at 4:00 p.m. on the hospital campus in West Columbia to celebrate a significant clinical expansion that’s about to begin. Lexington Medical Center is building a 545,000-sq-ft patient care tower that will make Lexington Medical Center the most modern, state-of-the-art hospital in South Carolina.
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The 10-story tower will initially add 71 inpatient beds to the 414-bed hospital with the ability to accommodate more patients in the future. It will feature patient rooms, operating rooms, educational space for staff and community members, and enhanced dining options, as well as expand the hospital’s Labor and Delivery and Mother/Baby departments.

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“Our medical staff, employees and volunteers understand and embrace the belief that Lexington Medical Center is here to serve our friends and neighbors. The hospital is woven into the fabric of Lexington County and the Midlands,” said Tod Augsburger, president & CEO of Lexington Medical Center. “This clinical expansion will allow us to take care of our community for many years to come.”

Lexington Medical Center is one of the busiest surgical hospitals in South Carolina, performing more than 19,000 surgeries last year. The clinical expansion will include eight additional operating rooms for a total of 31 operating rooms, and an expanded surgical recovery area. Six floors of the new tower will accommodate medical, critical care and surgical patients.

Welcoming more than 3,700 babies each year, the clinical expansion will become home to the hospital’s Labor and Delivery and Mother/Baby departments. In the Special Care Nursery, the hospital’s tiniest patients will have private rooms, which is an innovative concept in the Midlands. Research has shown that private rooms provide more bonding opportunities for mothers and their babies, lead to better outcomes for babies’ growth and lower infection rates.

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Because of the growth of the hospital and its network of care, the expansion will also include Lexington Medical Center’s Pharmacy department, which provides services for the hospital’s inpatient departments, six community medical and urgent care centers, and nearly 60 physician practices in 70 locations.

A new parking garage will add more than 950 parking spaces to the hospital’s campus and a central energy plant will support the service needs of the new tower.
The expansion is expected to be complete in 2019.

LMC Swansea Rehearses Emergency Response


Swansea, SC (WLTX) — During a health emergency one second can save a life. That is why Lexington Medical Center is making sure each one counts when it comes to caring for patient in rural areas of the Midlands.

Time counts when it comes to a heart attack and registered nurse and Community Medical Center Clinical Coordinator Darrell Tedder knows that first hand.

“I had a little burning chest pain. I thought it was reflux, took an antacid, didn’t work,” said Tedder.

That happened in 2008. He recognized the situation as serious and called his own ambulance.

“They took me to the hospital, where they opened me up, put a stint in, actually three, and I’m a survivor today,” said Tedder.

Now he and other medical professionals at the Lexington Medical Center’s Community Medical Center in Swansea are working to make sure those far away from the hospital’s main campus, can get to that care more quickly.

“The quicker you get somebody to a quick assessment, identification of the problem and get them to an area where they can be treated the less muscle that dies or is actually damaged,” he said.

The Swansea Community Medical Center held a drill to rehearse their response to a person having the most serious kind of heart attack called a STEMI, or ST segment elevation myocardial infarction. During a STEMI an artery is completely blocked off and part of the heart can begin to die. While the center can handle many kinds of medical emergencies, Dr. Donald Langston Powell says when they recognize a STEMI they begin procedures to get a patient to the main campus as soon as possible.

“When we call the helicopter or when we call the ambulance, there are personnel that are trained to take care of people. They’re all certified in advance cardiac life support and have all the tools necessary to take care of that patient,” said Powell.

While the community center is somewhat limited in what it can provide, Powell says receiving medications and care as they prepare to transport someone, is better than risking an attempt to reach the hospital on your own.

Happy Respiratory Care Week

LMC would like to send a heartfelt thank you to all of the Respiratory Therapists in our network of care for the compassionate care you give our patients everyday.