Tag Archives: MSN

Shining Bright in LMC Gold

Congratulations to the 10 outstanding nurses selected as LMC Gold recipients this year. Since 2006, LMC Gold has honored nurses within Lexington Medical Center’s network of care for their commitment to patients and the nursing profession. Nominated by their peers, these nurses display excellence in practice and leadership, participate in professional organizations and development, and contribute to the advancement of nursing, as well as provide patients with the best possible care. LMC Gold nurses received their awards at a special recognition dinner at the Capital City Club this week.

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Meghan Barfield, BSN, RN, RNC-OB
Labor and Delivery

Bethany Browning, BSN, RN, CCRN
Progressive Cardiac Unit

Kimberly Graham, BSN, RN, CEN
Emergency Department

Meredith Harrison, BSN, RN, RNC-MNN, IBCLC

Lindsey Hunter, BSN, RN, RN-BC
6th Medical

Michelle McAbee, BSN, RN, RN-BC
7th Medical

Betty Myslinski, BSN, RN, NE-BC
LMC Lexington Urgent Care

Libby Rikard, BSN, RN, RN-BC
4th Medical/CVA

Jennifer Rudasill, MNA, APRN, CRNA

Donna Wagner, MSN, RN, RN-BC
Center for Best Practice

Ask the Lexington Medical Center Clinician: What’s A Midwife?

Darci Putnam, CNM, MSN, is a certified nurse midwife at Lexington Women’s Care West Columbia, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. She answers a lot of questions from community members about what midwives do.

Q: What’s a certified nurse midwife?
A: A certified nurse midwife is an advanced practice registered nurse who provides comprehensive health care for women throughout their lives. Lexington Women’s Care has a staff of CNMs at its West Columbia location.

Q: How does someone become a CNM?
A: The CNMs at Lexington Women’s Care West Columbia have earned a master’s degree in nursing and completed rigorous clinical training. CNMs also graduate from an accredited midwifery education program and passed a national certification exam.

Q: Do midwives only care for pregnant women?
A: No. Midwives offer care to women from adolescence through menopause.

Q: What kind of gynecologic care does a midwife provide?
A: We care for women in all stages of life. Midwives provide routine well-woman exams, family planning and contraception, preconception counseling and problem-focused visits.

Darci Putnam

Q: Does using a midwife mean natural childbirth?
A: No. CNMs support a patient’s wishes for her birth experience. We participate in many deliveries at Lexington Medical Center with mothers who use medication to control pain during labor and delivery, including epidurals. We also have patients who would like to have natural childbirth, and we work with them to achieve that goal. We realize that every patient is different and unique.

Q: Do you offer at-home deliveries?
A: Some midwives participate in at-home deliveries. But like many other CNMs across the country, Lexington Women’s Care’s midwives only deliver babies at Lexington Medical Center.

Heart Health During Pregnancy

By Donna Andrews, MSN

Donna Andrews, MSN, is a certified nurse midwife at Lexington Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. Certified nurse midwives are advanced practice nurses who provide OB/GYN care for women throughout their lives. Here’s what she had to say about heart health during pregnancy.

A woman’s body produces 30 to 50 percent more blood during pregnancy. That can tax the heart and kidneys, and sometimes leave her short of breath. For most women, these changes do not cause lasting harm.

Donna Andrews, MSN, inside Lexington Women’s Care with a patient

Often, pregnancy is a woman’s first encounter with regular health visits and screenings. Urine, heart and blood pressure checks happen at every visit. An unusual result may require further tests for cardiac issues. We may discover hidden or even congenital heart problems such as heart murmurs, irregular heart rhythms or heart valve problems.

The trend of older women becoming pregnant raises the risk for serious issues including congestive heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and even stroke, as the heart, kidneys, heart valves and arteries become strained.

A new diagnosis of high blood pressure during pregnancy is a warning sign for preeclampsia, a potentially dangerous condition that prevents the placenta from receiving adequate blood flow and may threaten the health and life of mother and child. We also screen for high blood pressure because women who have it during pregnancy have a 40 percent chance of it continuing after the baby is born.

Because the heart plays a critical role for both the mother and baby, it’s important to be aware of danger signs that can flag serious issues: difficulty breathing or shortness of breath with exertion; rapid heart rate; chest pain; coughing at night or a bloody cough; and infrequent urination. Because so many issues can be identified early and treated, keeping monthly prenatal appointments is a critical factor for long-term health.

Throughout the entire pregnancy, we encourage daily exercise. Something as simple as a 30-minute walk each day can help pregnant women stay within the parameters of healthy weight gain. We know that gaining too much during pregnancy can damage the heart, even after the baby is born.

It’s easy to say when someone is feeling winded or tired that ‘it’s just pregnancy.’ But we need to listen to women and be sensitive to all of their needs. We take care of women for a lifetime. Our work is mostly prevention. If we can teach women about becoming healthier, it contributes to better health overall.