Tag Archives: Mary King

Breaking Down Bell’s Palsy

Bell’s Palsy causes sudden paralysis on one side of your face, making it look like your face is drooping. It happened to WIS-TV news anchor Mary King. In this story with Dr. Katie Dahlberg of Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic and Dr. Douglas Addy of Lexington Women’s Care, Mary shares her experience and hopes to help others.

Community Builder Cynthia Byrd

Congratulations to Cynthia Byrd, patient access representative at Lexington Medical Center Irmo outpatient surgery, on becoming a community builder! WIS-TV and Mungo Homes awarded her the honor this week for her work organizing an annual school supply drive and fashion show in honor of her late son Brandon, who was killed in a car accident at age 20. Proceeds from the fashion show benefit a scholarship fund in her son’s name.

WIS-TV news anchor Mary King and Matt Mungo of Mungo Homes came to Lexington Medical Center Irmo to surprise her with the Community Builder award. Co-workers surrounded her as everyone revealed the surprise.

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Learn more about Cynthia in the WIS-TV news story below.


The Remembering Brandon Lavar Byrd Fashion Show will be held next Saturday, Aug. 13 at Harbison Theatre at 5 p.m. Tickets are $10 a person and children under 3 are free.

Think Fast: How to Help Someone Who is Choking

This week, WIS-TV interviewed Dr. Don Moore of Lexington Medical Center’s Urgent Care in Irmo about how to help someone who is choking. The segment is below. The information is very valuable in a situation where you have to think fast.

Here are some notes from the doctor:

~When someone is choking, they will not be able to talk.
~Ask the person to try to cough.
~If the person cannot cough, try an abdominal thrust. From behind, put a clenched first above the person’s belly button and place your other hand over it. Pull up as if you were trying to lift the person off the ground, which will create a pressure wave to hopefully expel the object.
~If that doesn’t work, try back blows. With the base of your hand, hit the person on the back between the shoulder blades.
~Alternate between abdominal thrusts and back blows until the object is out.
~If the person goes unconscious, call 911 and start CPR.
~Anyone who has had a choking episode should see a physician to make sure they’re OK.

~If you’re alone, try performing an abdominal thrust by yourself with the help of a chair or table.

~If you have a baby who is choking, tip the child over and perform softer back blows.