Tag Archives: mammography

Expanding 3-D Mammography with the Campaign for Clarity

Join the Lexington Medical Center Foundation on Thursday, March 29 for the McDaniels Automotive Group Gala benefitting Lexington Medical Center’s Campaign for Clarity, a capital campaign to expand 3-D mammography throughout Lexington Medical Center’s network of care.

In this video, Dr. Beth Siroty-Smith of Lexington RAaiology Associates at Lexington Medical Center explains the significance of 3-D mammography in detecting breast cancer early and improving outcomes.


The black tie optional event will take place at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. It will feature live and silent auctions, music by The Root Doctors and catering from the Blue Marlin.

Live auction items at the gala include Hootie and the Blowfish Monday after the Masters tickets with VIP access; a party for 100 attendees at the Vista Room in Columbia with food, beer and wine from the Blue Marlin and live music; and a “Create Your Own Trip” package with a Ritz-Carlton hotel stay and international airline tickets.

Silent auction items include a Live PD Ride Along; four tickets to see the Eagles; a Seabrook Island golf weekend; and a driving experience at the Porsche Experience Center in Atlanta.

Also known as ‘tomosynthesis,’ 3-D mammography creates a group of three-dimensional pictures of the breast and allows doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time, making tiny details visible earlier and easier.

3-D mammography uses a low dose X-ray to create multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan. The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2-D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Studies have shown that 3-D mammography also reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

To buy tickets for the gala, visit McDanielsGolfClassic.com. Individual tickets and sponsorships are available.

If you can’t attend the gala but would like to contribute to the Campaign for Clarity, click here.

Men Get Breast Cancer, Too

One out of every 100 cases of breast cancer is in a man. While the incidence is much lower in men than women, few know that men are 10 times more likely to die from the disease than women. Husband, father and former high school running back Rodney Harmon was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 43 after feeling something unusual in his left side.

Meet Rodney and listen to his story in his own words in this video.

 

Rodney had a family history of breast cancer. His mother, grandmother and grandfather had breast cancer, and all were diagnosed at fairly young ages.

After the mammogram at Lexington Medical Center revealed a suspicious lesion, Rodney received an ultrasound and then a biopsy. The next day, he got the call confirming a stage 2 breast cancer diagnosis. He had surgery and was proscribed medication for five years. Determined to minimize the impact, Rodney returned to work at a manufacturing plant in Winnsboro only a week after surgery.

“The important thing for me was getting back to normal,” he said. “Cancer is a disease that if you think you’re beaten, you’re beaten. But I know that with the right mindset, you can get through anything. If your thought process is, ‘this is just a bump in the road,’ and you keep moving, then everything will be all right.”

The surgery left a long scar that shows when Rodney works out. “For a little while, you feel disfigured when you go through something like that. But I had a 10-year-old kid with a brain tumor who was looking at my scar, and he said, ‘you look like a superhero.’ If he can say that, then I’m not going to feel bad about it.”

Like many women with breast cancer, Rodney found support from co-workers and friends. And far from hiding his experience, Harmon leverages his status. He meets with newly diagnosed men for lunch to talk and answer questions.

“If it’s going to raise awareness, then my answer is ‘yes,’” he said.

Rodney advises men to get a physical every year as a precaution.

“A real man is one who is not afraid to get checked out, and if something is wrong, not afraid to tell people about it,” he said. “I’m blessed. I’m walking above ground and not lying below it. In the grand scheme of things, everything that happens to you is a chance to learn and help the next person.”

#ItsOurFightToo

For more information about Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program, visit LexMed.com/Cancer.

When Should We Begin Having Mammograms?

The American Cancer Society has released new guidelines suggesting that women begin mammography at age 45 instead of the previous recommendation of 40. Dr. Kathryn Moore, gynecologist at Vista Women’s Healthcare, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, was a guest on WIS-TV with news anchor Judi Gatson to talk about it. She offered great insight and advice in the interview below.


Here are a few takeaways from Dr. Moore’s interview:

~The new guidelines suggest it will reduce false positives. However, new mammography technology reduces the number of false positives. Ultimately, the guidelines will likely go back to 40.

~Talk to your doctor each year about your family history and risk factors to determine when you should begin mammography.

~The age at which to begin mammography should be made on an individual basis.

~A baseline mammogram is important for every woman.