Tag Archives: mammogram

Gala Will Benefit 3-D Mammography at Lexington Medical Center

Join the Lexington Medical Center Foundation on Thursday, March 29 for the McDaniels Automotive Group Gala benefitting Lexington Medical Center’s Campaign for Clarity, a capital campaign to expand 3-D mammography throughout Lexington Medical Center’s network of care.

The black tie optional event will take place at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center from 6:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. It will feature live and silent auctions, music by The Root Doctors and catering from the Blue Marlin.

Live auction items at the gala include Hootie and the Blowfish Monday after the Masters tickets with VIP access; a party for 100 attendees at the Vista Room in Columbia with food, beer and wine from the Blue Marlin and live music; and a “Create Your Own Trip” package with a Ritz-Carlton hotel stay and international airline tickets.

Silent auction items include a Live PD Ride Along; four tickets to see the Eagles; a Seabrook Island golf weekend; and a driving experience at the Porsche Experience Center in Atlanta.

Also known as ‘tomosynthesis,’ 3-D mammography creates a group of three-dimensional pictures of the breast and allows doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time, making tiny details visible earlier and easier.

Patients will find that 3-D mammography is no different from the mammogram they are accustomed to as far as compression, positioning and time. The benefit to patients is that the multiple layers of images resulting from 3-D mammography can help doctors better evaluate the breast tissue.

3-D mammography uses a low dose X-ray to create multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan. The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2-D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Studies have shown that 3-D mammography also reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

To buy tickets for the gala, visit McDanielsGolfClassic.com. Individual tickets and sponsorships are available.

Campaign for Clarity Tip-Off

Join the Lexington Medical Center Foundation, University of South Carolina men’s head basketball coach Frank Martin, Cocky, USC cheerleaders, the Carolina Girls and Gamecock fans for the “Campaign for Clarity Tip-Off” on Monday, November 6.

Proceeds from this event at the Colonial Life Arena will raise money for the Lexington Medical Center Foundation’s “Campaign for Clarity,” a capital campaign to provide 3-D mammography throughout Lexington Medical Center’s network of care.

Beginning at 6:30 p.m., the event includes a question and answer session with Coach Martin, hors d’oeuvres and a cash bar. Tickets are $75 per person and can be purchased at LexMed.com/tipoff.

Frank Martin became the head coach of the University of South Carolina men’s basketball team in 2012. He coached the team to the school’s first-ever appearance in the Final Four in the 2017 NCAA tournament.

As a leader in cancer care in the Midlands, Lexington Medical Center has a goal of expanding its 3-D mammography program throughout the hospital’s network of care. It currently provides 3-D mammogram technology at some of its Women’s Imaging locations and physician practices.

Producing multiple images of breast tissue within seconds, studies have shown that 3-D mammography increases breast cancer detection and reduces false positives. Women who would like to schedule a 3-D mammogram at Lexington Medical Center should call (803) 791 – 2486.

For more information on the Lexington Medical Center Foundation, visit LMCFoundation.com.

Campaign for Clarity Tip-Off
Monday, November 6, 2017
6:30 p.m.
Colonial Life Arena
$75 per person

Local woman’s cancer battle uncovers family link


A Midlands woman’s fight against breast cancer led to a discovery that may save the lives of her sisters and daughters.

Click for Video: wistv.com – Columbia, South Carolina

Kelly, Kathryn and Ashley

Kelly, Kathryn and Ashley


Kathryn Robinson’s cancer battle started more than two years ago.  “I was preparing to go to work, and while I was in the shower I just accidentally felt a lump in my breast,” said Robinson.

It had been less than two months since Robinson’s yearly mammogram, but she knew something wasn’t right. “I called the doctor and went in that afternoon,” said Robinson. “He sent me in for an ultrasound that next Monday.”

Just a few days after the ultrasound Robinson was diagnosed with breast cancer and life immediately changed for her and her family.

“When my mom was diagnosed and she talked about getting genetic testing done, that’s the first time I had ever heard of the gene,” said Robinson’s 24 year-old daughter, Ashley Lyons.

Robinson’s family quickly learned about the BRCA gene malformation. It’s hereditary and when present greatly increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. In the midst of chemo, Kathryn tested positive for the gene.

“I had eight rounds of chemotherapy, and I was scheduled to do radiation after that, but because I was positive with the BRCA2 gene, they did a bilateral mastectomy,” said Robinson.

Doctors at Lexington Medical Center recommended the mastectomy and a hysterectomy in hopes of eliminating Robinson’s future cancer risks. They also advised her family to get tested for the gene.

“I had one sister that wasn’t interested in getting tested and a younger sister that I can usually persuade to do just about anything… she went and got tested,” said Robinson.

As it turned out, Robinson’s sister Kelly Moore also tested positive for the gene malformation. “I feel like I’m the lucky one,” said Moore. “Kathryn helped to educate me, and I had all of her valuable information for what she had gone through.

Moore chose to have her ovaries removed as a preventive measure, and is now getting more frequent breast exams. For Robinson’s daughter Ashley, the decision was more difficult.

“At first, I did not want to know,” said Ashley. “I did not want to be tested.” But Ashley says her older sister talked her into being tested for the gene. While her older sister does not have the BRCA malformation, Ashley does.

“At first I was like how do you test positive and do nothing about it…so that was kind of hard in the beginning,” said Ashley.

But medical oncologist Dr. Steve Madden at Lexington Medical center says at Ashley’s young age it’s okay not to undergo preventive surgery as long as she’s pro-active. “As long as you’re aware, you’re going to be on top of anything and catch it much earlier if it develops at all,” added Dr. Madden.

Kathryn has been a survivor now for two years. Her family calls her a lifesaver. “She was very positive, and she inspired all of us to take a fighting approach to it,” said Moore.

Dr. Madden says doctors usually advise anyone diagnosed with breast cancer who is under the age of 50 to be tested for the gene. They also advise immediate family members of breast cancer patients to be tested, as well.

Click for the full video: WIS TV VIDEO