Tag Archives: LMC Foundation

Irmo Man Donates $50,000 to Lexington Medical Center Foundation

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation received a $50,000 gift Tuesday from an Irmo man who wanted to recognize the hospital and its staff members for the outstanding care they provided to his wife. This significant donation will establish a fund called “Linda’s Love” that will help patients in need receive specialized medical care.
 
Jeffrey Angstadt presented the gift to the Lexington Medical Center Foundation Board of Directors today in honor of his wife Linda, who died in 2014. Linda had received extensive treatment at Lexington Medical Center for cancer, congestive heart failure and complications from the flu, totaling more than 100 days in the hospital.
 

Jeffrey Angstadt with his family and Lexington Medical Center Foundation board members.

Jeffrey Angstadt with his family and Lexington Medical Center Foundation board members.

“During that time, I learned the impact that other people can have on a life,” Mr. Angstadt said. “For me, those people are the doctors, nurses and staff at Lexington Medical Center. The medical care was perfect, but it went far beyond that. The compassion, support and love that was shared with my children and me was life sustaining.”
 
Since then, Mr. Angstadt worked to support Lexington Medical Center and its Foundation. He began volunteering in the hospital’s Emergency department. He also became a member of the Lexington Medical Center Foundation’s Heritage Society; a group whose members bequeath planned gifts from their estates to help fulfill the mission of the Foundation in our community in the future. And, he honored the clinicians who cared for his wife in the hospital’s Medical Intensive Care Unit through the Foundation’s Grateful Patient program, recognizing the 32 staff members who showed compassion to him and his wife during her illness with a wall plaque there.
 
And now, Mr. Angstadt hopes his generous donation will help patients in need to receive treatment for underlying conditions, encourage preventative care, and achieve long-term health and well being.
 
Jeff and his wife Linda

Jeff and his wife Linda

“The Lexington Medical Center Foundation is tremendously grateful for the kindness, generosity, and vision of Jeffrey Angstadt and his children as they honor the legacy of his wife and their mother,” said Barbara Willm, Vice President of Development and Community Relations at Lexington Medical Center. “Through the generosity of this family, we will be able to provide expanded access to care for our most vulnerable patients.”

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation works to provide programs and services that enhance the health and well being of hospital patients, family members and the community.

Programs include assistance for patients battling cancer, scholarships to encourage students to further their education in health care, tools that help families to cope with difficult times, wellness workouts for cardiac rehabilitation patients, a program that provides transitional care to patients returning home from a hospital stay, and a pastoral care fund that helps provide resources to assist families in the grieving and healing process.

The Angstadts were married for 35 years. They had two children and two grandchildren.
 
“Through everything that’s happened, I’ve come to realize that I’m part of something great at Lexington Medical Center. It’s a great hospital – my involvement with the Foundation has given me a glimpse of just how great,” Mr. Angstadt said. “I am and will be involved in every way possible to help others and honor Linda.  The Foundation is helping me do that.”

To learn more about how to contribute to the Linda’s Love fund, visit LMCFoundation.com.

Exercise for Cancer Patients

“You can lift that much weight?”

That’s the question Debra Carter got at Health Directions, Lexington Medical Center’s fitness and wellness gym, recently.

Her 30-pound presses on a strength training machine would be impressive to anyone. But what was even more impressive – and that no one knew – was that Carter was a cancer patient, still undergoing treatment, too.

The Cayce woman, age 52, was diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 2011. She underwent a lumpectomy and dozens of radiation treatments. During the end of radiation, she started going to Health Directions for Cancer Exercise Training, a program run with the help of the Lexington Medical Center Foundation.

Cancer Survivors 0144That’s where she met Thad Werts, who, with a Cancer Exercise Trainer (CET) certification from the American College of Sports Medicine, is an expert in helping people with cancer exercise correctly. A CET understands cancer patients’ diagnosis, surgeries, treatments, symptoms and side effects.

“With cancer, you can be active,” he said. “I look at what we can do to make everyone’s cancer experience better.”

In March, Werts put Carter on an 8-session, twice-per-week program to increase her strength and endurance, including a mix of cardio and weights.

With his training, he understands how cancer impacts exercise, and what it’s important for patients to do – and not to do. For example, chemotherapy can lower cardiovascular endurance. And, that it’s important to be careful with range of motion for breast cancer patients who’ve had surgery, especially with chest exercises.

“I can help them build back up their muscle so that they have more strength,” he said.

Carter liked it.

“It makes you feel so much better because you have more energy,” she said.

Since beginning the program two years ago, Werts has built up the program to train about ten patients each month, including breast, prostate and colon cancer patients.

The importance of such exercise is well-documented among cancer clinicians, who stress the importance of incorporating wellness activity into regimens for people who are moving into the survivor phase of life.

This exercise has emotional benefits, too.

“There’s a depression factor that I didn’t understand until I went through the training,” Werts said. “Women who have gone through hormone therapy have a tendency to gain more weight, so they feel more self-conscious.”

He says exercise can help them feel happier.

“I love the clinical aspect,” he said. “I knew I never wanted to be a doctor, but that I wanted to help as many people as possible.”

It’s made a difference for Carter. Werts has inspired her to exercise for the long-term.

“He has given me a second chance,” she said.

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation provides important programs and services that help people in our community, including cancer patients. Please consider giving to the Lexington Medical Center Foundation during the Central Carolina Community Foundation’s “Midlands Gives” challenge on May 5. Learn more at MidlandsGives.org.