Tag Archives: Lexington Oncology

A Young Mother’s Cancer Story

Imagine learning you have Stage 4 cancer at age 29 – you’re a newlywed and the mom of a little boy. Scarlet Lutz of Chapin has colon cancer that has spread to her liver. Her condition is considered terminal. She shared her story in this WIS-TV news report hoping to help others recognize their symptoms and see their doctor promptly. Scarlet’s doctor is Steven Madden, MD, of Lexington Oncology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, who shares his insights on the disease.

 

The incidence of colon cancer is rapidly increasing in young people. Doctors aren’t sure why, but think it may have to do with diet – including eating a lot of red meat and processed foods – rising obesity rates, smoking and sedentary lifestyles.

Typically, doctors recommend a colon cancer screening called a colonoscopy at age 50 – or younger if you have a family history of the disease. Also – regardless of age – talk to your doctor if you have symptoms including abdominal cramps, blood in the stool, changes in the appearance of the stool, or changes in bowel habits.

Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death – behind lung cancer. It’s also preventable – and treatable when detected early. Unfortunately, if it’s not caught early and spreads to other parts of the body, it can be difficult to cure. And, more than 60% of people in South Carolina who should have a colonoscopy report never having the screening.

For more information about cancer service at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Cancer.

Colon Cancer Increasing in Young People

The incidence of colon cancer is increasing in young people. In fact, Dr. Perrie Ryan of Lexington Oncology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, says studies show that by 2030, 90% of 20-somethings will develop colon cancer in their lifetime. Why? Listen to what he says in the WLTX interview below.

 

While there are many risk factors for colon cancer, Dr. Ryan says that factors including obesity, a sedentary lifestyle, eating a lot of red meat or processed meat and diabetes in younger people may be contributing to the increase in young people.

Each year, about 2,000 people in South Carolina are diagnosed with colon cancer and about 800 die from the disease. In fact, it’s the second deadliest form of cancer behind lung cancer. But it’s also preventable – and treatable when detected early. The best way to prevent colon cancer is to have a colonoscopy. That test can locate and remove polyps before they turn into cancer. Talk to your doctor about when you should begin colon cancer screening.

For more information about cancer services at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Cancer.

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. Today, Lisa Phillips.

Lisa Phillips, Lexington Oncology Infusion Center
Lisa has been a breast cancer survivor since October 2009 when she was diagnosed with high grade, poorly differentiated, atypical invasive ductal carcinoma, stage IIA.

lisa“I completed chemotherapy and underwent a bilateral mastectomy in 2010. My treatment was a complete success, and there was absolutely no cancer at the time of surgery.”

Lisa discovered her cancer through a self-breast exam, but she also had a family history of breast cancer.

lisa-phillips050a“Within five years, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in both breasts, and mammograms detected her cancer both times. My great-grandmother and great aunt also had breast cancer. Self-breast exams and mammograms can save your life.”

In the five years since Lexington Medical Center’s first Pink Glove Dance, Lisa has used her experience battling cancer to better care for patients, encouraging them to believe in themselves.

“Look for joy in every day, and I believe it will change your perspective on your journey.”