Tag Archives: Lexington Medical Heart Center

Lexington Medical Center Implants Micra Wireless Pacemaker

Lexington Medical Center has become the first hospital in South Carolina to implant a new wireless pacemaker known as Micra™ into a patient to fix a slow heartbeat. Called the world’s smallest pacemaker, this device is not visible under the skin, and because there are no wires connected to it, there is a lower risk of complications. The Lexington Medical Heart Center team performed this pacemaker implantation inside the hospital’s cardiac electrophysiology lab on March 14, 2017.

“This device represents a significant breakthrough in pacing technology,” said William W. Brabham, MD, FHRS, of Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. “The ability to deliver pacing therapy using such a small device is revolutionary. It’s very exciting to think of the possibilities in the future.”

Dr. William Brabham

A pacemaker helps restore a healthy heart rhythm by sending tiny electrical signals to the heart to increase the heart rate. Traditionally, pacemakers have been implanted below the collarbone through an incision and have included leads, which are insulated wires. The leads carry the electrical impulse from the pacemaker to the heart.

The size of a vitamin capsule, Micra is more than 90 percent smaller than other pacemakers. It’s implanted in a minimally-invasive procedure through a vein in the leg directly into the heart, removing the need for leads to act as pulse generators and the appearance of any visible scar below the collarbone. Because leads in traditional pacemakers may shift, there is a small risk of those devices not working properly when needed; with no leads, Micra eliminates that concern. Also, its size and location can mean fewer post-implant activity restrictions and no obstructions to shoulder movement.

Micra

Manufactured by Medtronic, Micra is the first FDA-approved wireless pacemaker. It’s for patients who need a single chamber pacemaker. The device has more than a 99 percent implant success rate and 48 percent fewer major complications reported than with traditional pacemakers.

The Lexington Medical Heart Center team has received extensive training on proper device implantation. Dr. Brabham and Robert Malanuk, MD, FACC, performed the first Micra implantation at the hospital

For more information on Lexington Medical Center’s comprehensive cardiovascular care program, visit LexMed.com/Heart.

Sweet Dreams of Better Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep affects everything from your daytime energy to heart health. If you’re having trouble catching ZZZs, the sleep lab at Lexington Sleep Solutions can help. Check out how in this news story from WIS-TV.

 

How A Lifetime of Bad Choices Leads to Heart Disease

We’re wrapping up American Heart Month with a visit with the doctor. Dr. Brandon Drafts of Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, talks about how a lifetime of bad choices can lead to heart disease in this WLTX interview you can watch below.

 

While are some risk factors we can’t control such our age or genetics, we CAN control diet, activity level, tobacco use, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

You should get about 30 minutes of exercise a day five days a week. Focus on a consistent, long-term exercise regimen with a progression in intensity.

Smomking can increase our risk for heart disease by causing fatty plaque buildup in the heart that can ultimately lead to heart attacks.

Blood pressure is the force blood exerts on the blood vessels. Ultimately, it can weaken the blood vessels or cause the heart to thicken, weakening the function of the heart.

Generally speaking, cholesterol is a good thing because cells need cholseterol to fucntion normally. Cholesterol becomes a problem when there’s an imbalance of it, which can lead to fatty buildup in the arteries.

Stress is a modifiable risk factor that doesn’t get as much attention as it should. It’s hard to objectify or measure stress. Indirectly, it can affect blood pressure or create unhealthy habits of dealing with stress like smoking or drinking alcohol. It can also make plaque buildup in the heart unsteady, which can lead to a heart attack.

Lexington Medical Center wants you to “Just Say Know” to heart disease. Visit LexMed.com/Know to take a heart health quiz and find more information.