Tag Archives: lexington Medical Center

“Just Say Know” on National Wear Red Day

It’s National Wear Red Day! Hospital clinicians and staff gathered in our North Tower Atrium today dressed in our red best and in the shape of a heart to encourage our community to “Just Say Know” to heart disease. One out of every 3 people in South Carolina dies from cardiovascular disease. And, heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women in the world. Knowing your risk factors and how to prevent them can save your life.

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Lexington Medical Center’s “Just Say Know” campaign emphasizes four main ways people can protect themselves against heart disease:

1. KNOW the risk factors.
2. KNOW when to talk to your doctor.
3. KNOW how to lower your risk.
4. KNOW when to call 9-1-1.

Risk factors for heart disease include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, smoking and a stressful lifestyle. Talking to your doctor about your heart, even if you’re healthy, is important. February is a perfect time to speak with your health care provider about your overall heart health, any concerns you may have, or questions you want to ask so that you can take control of your heart health.

And, during the month of February, Lexington Medical Center will be lit up at night with red lights to remind community members to “Just Say Know” to heart disease.

To test your heart health knowledge, go to LexMed.com/Know to take an online quiz.

You can also schedule a hospital speaker to talk to your business, church group or organization about heart disease. Visit LexMed.com/Know or call Lexington Medical Center Community Outreach at (803) 936-8850.

Lexington Medical Center will host a FREE heart fair on Sunday, February 28 from Noon – 4:00 p.m. at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center in downtown Columbia. Attendees can walk through a MEGA inflatable heart, take an exercise class, and learn their blood pressure and Body Mass Index (BMI). Visitors can also learn about advanced technologies for heart care, meet Lexington Medical Center physicians and watch healthy cooking demonstrations.

Five Things to Know About the Zika Virus

The Zika Virus has become a major concern for the the World Health Organization. The mosquito-borne illness may be linked to birth defects including microcephaly in newborns. Dr. Samantha Morton of Carolina Women’s Physicians, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, was a guest on WLTX to talk about what moms-to-be in South Carolina need to know about this virus.


Here are some notes from Dr. Morton’s interview:

1. The Zika Virus is transmitted by a mosquito that has previously bitten someone who has the virus.

2. While the mosquito that can carry the Zika Virus is in South Carolina, no patients have been diagnosed with the Zika Virus from a mosquito that has bitten them in the United States.

3. There is some evidence that the Zika Virus may be responsible for causing some birth defects including microcephaly. Microcephaly is a condition where a baby’s brain does not grow properly during pregnancy. But so far, there is no definitive link.

4. The only people who need to be concerned right now are individuals who have traveled to areas that are endemic for the Zika Virus, including South America, Central America and Mexico. for this particular virus. If you have symptoms, talk to your health care provider.

5. Pregnant women should avoid travel to the countries where cases have been diagnosed.

For more information about the Zika Virus, visit the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website.

Losing Weight with Orbera

With our fast-paced lives, losing weight can be easier said than done. Between keeping up with busy work schedules, children’s activities and daily housework, eating healthy and exercising can become an obstacle and challenge.

This illustration shows how Orbera is placed in the stomach.

This illustration shows how Orbera is placed in the stomach.

That’s where a new weight-loss procedure at the South Carolina Obesity Surgery Center, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, comes in. It’s called Orbera, and Lexington Medical Center is the first hospital in the Southeast to offer it.

“Orbera is ideal for people who are 25 to 60 pounds overweight, and who need a jump start to begin to lose weight and improve their health,” said Marc Antonetti, MD, FACS, surgeon with the South Carolina Obesity Surgery Center.

Orbera is a soft, silicone balloon with saline that’s designed to fit comfortably in your stomach. Its volume and shape are meant to take up space in the stomach, which encourages portion control by making you feel full and giving you the edge to finally lose weight.

This video shows how it works.

Doctors place Orbera in the stomach through a simple, non-surgical, outpatient procedure completed under sedation. There is no incision and patients can go home the same day. In fact, the FDA-approved procedure only takes 20 to 30 minutes.

Orbera is a tool that will remain in place for six months. During that time, patients receive comprehensive education from clinicians and dietitians at the South Carolina Obesity Surgery Center about healthy eating, including information about nutritious foods, portion size and meal planning. They are monitored on a routine basis.

The South Carolina Obesity Surgery Center physicians: Marc C. Antonetti, MD, FACS; S. Gray Hughes, MD, FACS; Glen F. Strickland, MD, FACS

The South Carolina Obesity Surgery Center physicians: Marc C. Antonetti, MD, FACS; S. Gray Hughes, MD, FACS; Glen F. Strickland, MD, FACS

“About 60 percent of the United States population is a candidate for this procedure – because they need to lose between 25 and 60 pounds,” said Dr. Antonetti. “Our goal is to reach out to teach people about appropriate nutrition and prevent them from becoming morbidly obese.”

In addition to making patients feel full and causing weight loss, Orbera will condition patients to eat smaller meals and require less food. After six months, the balloon is removed. By that time, patients have established healthy lifestyle choices to continue to lose weight and keep it off.

Losing weight is important for cardiovascular and overall health. There are many options available at Lexington Medical Center.

For more information about Orbera, visit SCObesity.com.