Tag Archives: lexington Medical Center

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. Today, Lisa Phillips.

Lisa Phillips, Lexington Oncology Infusion Center
Lisa has been a breast cancer survivor since October 2009 when she was diagnosed with high grade, poorly differentiated, atypical invasive ductal carcinoma, stage IIA.

lisa“I completed chemotherapy and underwent a bilateral mastectomy in 2010. My treatment was a complete success, and there was absolutely no cancer at the time of surgery.”

Lisa discovered her cancer through a self-breast exam, but she also had a family history of breast cancer.

lisa-phillips050a“Within five years, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in both breasts, and mammograms detected her cancer both times. My great-grandmother and great aunt also had breast cancer. Self-breast exams and mammograms can save your life.”

In the five years since Lexington Medical Center’s first Pink Glove Dance, Lisa has used her experience battling cancer to better care for patients, encouraging them to believe in themselves.

“Look for joy in every day, and I believe it will change your perspective on your journey.”

Congratulations, Partners Program Graduates!

Congratulations to the 61 high school students from around South Carolina who graduated from the Partners Program today!

Partners_Grad_2016

Now in its 26th year, this program introduces some of Lexington County’s brightest high school students to a career in the health care industry.

During a three-week session, students rotated through three clinical areas in the mornings. They participated in afternoon activities two days a week at the University of South Carolina School of Nursing, Midlands Technical College’s surgical technician program and LMC Extended Care.

The Partners Program continues to be a popular program with Lexington County students and hospital staff. In fact, several hospital employees participated in the program when they attended high school.

Supported by the Lexington Medical Center Foundation, this year’s Partners Program received 170 applications. The students went through a rigorous interview process with a written application and an interview with a panel of hospital staff members.

Today, the Lexington Medical Center Foundation awarded a rising senior from each Lexington County high school and one rising senior from home/private schools with a $1,000 book scholarship for their freshman year of college.

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation thanks the South Carolina National Safety Council, NORD Family Foundation, Colonial Life and Women of Hope for supporting the 2016 Partners Program.

Congratulations, HUGS Ambassadors!

Lexington Medical Center has teamed up with award-winning entertainment personality, health advocate and Irmo native Leeza Gibbons to develop a new program called HUGS, which stands for “Helping U Grow Strong,” to support family caregivers. The first graduates of the program were recognized on Thursday, July 7. This first-of-its-kind program allows experienced local caregivers to support other caregivers in the Midlands.

HUGS 2016_group

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation is able to offer the HUGS ambassador program thanks to a donation from Leeza Gibbons and her husband Steven Fenton in honor of the outstanding care Gibbons’ father received while he was a patient at Lexington Medical Center.

HUGS ambassadors take a six-week course that gives them the skills they need to help empower other caregivers to face their difficult journeys with courage and strength. The curriculum includes learning how to help others navigate health resources in our community and how to provide the emotional support caregivers need. The HUGS program validates the tremendous role family caregivers play in the recovery and treatment process of others.

The first group of HUGS ambassadors graduated from the program at the July 7 event inside the Lexington Medical Park 1 auditorium. They are Maisy Babbitt, Fran Bond, Dottie Foreman, Becky Furgeson, Dottie Fulmer, Harold A. Kline, Mary Malnic, Judy McNair, Gael Stanley and Joanne W. Taylor.

“More than 65 million people across our nation provide care for a chronically ill, disabled or elderly family member or friend each year,” said Barbara Willm, vice president of Development and Community Relations at Lexington Medical Center. “We’re thrilled to work with Leeza and her family to launch such an important outreach program. Leeza has such a passion for serving those who care for others, and the Midlands community will benefit greatly from her generosity.”

Graduates of the HUGS ambassador program will be placed at Leeza’s Care Connection, a new community resource center in Irmo dedicated to caregivers. Leeza’s Care Connection also operates a resource center in Los Angeles.

“Caring for someone you love with a chronic illness or disease is not anyone’s version of ‘happily ever after,’ and yet, every year hundreds of thousands of courageous caregivers emerge in partnership with someone they love to face a diagnosis they never wanted to battle,” Gibbons said. “This program allows us to salute and support those who make the defining difference.”

For more information or to volunteer to become a HUGS ambassador, call (803) 791-2540.