Tag Archives: lexington Medical Center

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. Today, Amy Stansell.

Amy Stansell, Lexington Medical Center Operating Room Nurse
Diagnosed at 35 years old with poorly differentiated, estrogen and progesterone receptor positive, invasive ductal carcinoma, stage IA, Amy knew participating in the Pink Glove Dance was a chance to show people that breast cancer is not just an issue for older women.

amys“I had three children in elementary school when I was diagnosed, so this was very important to me. I embraced my journey and used it for good,” said Amy.

In the five years since the Pink Glove Dance, many things have changed for her.

amy-stansell028b“I have been cancer free for nine years! I completed my bachelor’s degree in nursing and went back to work full time in the Operating Room at Lexington Medical Center.”

Amy emphasizes the importance of self-breast exams. She found her cancer during a self exam as did her oldest sister. She has a strong family history but no genetic markers.

“Self-breast exams are very important. They allow you to know your body and alerts you to any change. Yearly mammograms are a must, too. Early detection does save lives.”

Orbera Helps Columbia Woman Lose 50 Pounds

Orbera is a balloon that doctors at the South Carolina Obesity Surgery Center, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, insert in the stomach to help curb appetite and promote weight loss. They began using the procedure in January of this year. One of their first patients was Chenise Nu. And wait until you see her success story in the below news interview from WIS-TV! Chenise lost 50 pounds and is feeling great. Watch below.

 

For more information about Orbera, visit SCObesity.com

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. Today, Lisa Phillips.

Lisa Phillips, Lexington Oncology Infusion Center
Lisa has been a breast cancer survivor since October 2009 when she was diagnosed with high grade, poorly differentiated, atypical invasive ductal carcinoma, stage IIA.

lisa“I completed chemotherapy and underwent a bilateral mastectomy in 2010. My treatment was a complete success, and there was absolutely no cancer at the time of surgery.”

Lisa discovered her cancer through a self-breast exam, but she also had a family history of breast cancer.

lisa-phillips050a“Within five years, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in both breasts, and mammograms detected her cancer both times. My great-grandmother and great aunt also had breast cancer. Self-breast exams and mammograms can save your life.”

In the five years since Lexington Medical Center’s first Pink Glove Dance, Lisa has used her experience battling cancer to better care for patients, encouraging them to believe in themselves.

“Look for joy in every day, and I believe it will change your perspective on your journey.”