Tag Archives: Lexington Medical Center Foundation

Congratulations, Partners!

Today, Lexington Medical Center held a graduation ceremony for participants in the 2017 Partners Program, a health care internship at the hospital for high school students from Lexington County. In its 27th year, the Partners Program attracts some of the best and brightest high school students in Lexington County every summer.

The 2017 Partners Program focused on allied health careers with interactive, hands-on seminars, clinical rotations and tours of educational institutions. While students learned about all areas of health care, the internship highlighted the work of allied health professionals including physical therapists, radiology technicians and surgical technologists.

During a three-week session, students rotated through three clinical areas in the mornings. They participated in afternoon activities two days a week at the University of South Carolina School of Nursing, Midlands Technical College’s surgical technologist program and Lexington Medical Center Extended Care.

At the end of the program, the Lexington Medical Center Foundation awarded a rising senior from each Lexington County high school and one rising senior from home/private schools with a $1,000 book scholarship for their freshman year of college.

South Carolina’s First Diabetic Food Pantry

Lexington Medical Center, Harvest Hope Food Bank and the American Diabetes Association are working together to establish the first diabetic food pantry in South Carolina. Scheduled to open July 1, the D2 & Me Diabetic Food Pantry will allow community members in need with diabetes to pick up special boxes of healthy staple foods and fresh produce that are diabetic friendly.

The idea for the diabetic food pantry came from Natalie Copeland, a Lexington Medical Center employee who has type 2 diabetes and created a health and wellness group called “D2 & Me” for diabetics in the Midlands.

Natalie Copeland

“I learned a lot of people who have diabetes use a food pantry. Sometimes, the food they receive is heavy on carbohydrates. The diabetic food pantry will help to ensure that they receive a nutritional balance of food that will help them manage their diabetes well,” said Copeland.

Recipients at the diabetic food pantry will get boxes that include peanut butter, brown rice, dry pinto beans, oats, Corn Flakes cereal, milk, mandarin oranges, unsweetened applesauce, whole wheat spaghetti noodles, green beans, tomatoes, carrots and chicken. They will also receive a packet with recipes, a brochure about diabetes from the American Diabetes Association, and a schedule of D2 & Me meetings.

“It has always been part of Harvest Hope’s mission to provide quality food for those in need,” said Denise Holland, CEO of Harvest Hope Food Bank. “We are thrilled to be working with Lexington Medical Center and our community partners to help provide for those who are facing the double struggle of diabetes and hunger.”
 
A Lexington Medical Center Foundation grant is providing the first boxes of food for the diabetic food pantry. Community members who donate to Harvest Hope Food Bank are encouraged to bring foods on the diabetic list. There are also opportunities for corporate sponsorships. For information on donations, visit HarvestHope.org or call the Columbia office at (803) 254 – 4432.

“A healthy diet is an important factor in managing diabetes. The American Diabetes Association is pleased to partner with Lexington Medical Center and Harvest Hope to provide resources in support of the diabetic food pantry in South Carolina,” said John Douglas, manager of Community Health Strategies with the American Diabetes Association in Columbia.
 
For now, the program is working with three pilot pantries where community members will pick up the diabetic food boxes: Church of Christ Sunset Boulevard in West Columbia; Sharing God’s Love in Irmo; and Mission of Hope in Cayce. People who are interested in receiving the boxes should contact Harvest Hope’s Columbia office at (803) 254 – 4432.

Eventually, organizers would like to expand the program to all Harvest Hope Food Bank agencies in South Carolina.

Diabetes in South Carolina
In South Carolina, one in eight adults has diabetes. This rate is the seventh highest in the United States. And according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes are also obese.

Diabetes can create a domino effect of complications. High sugar levels in the blood damage small blood vessels and nerves, leading to a risk of cardiovascular disease, stroke, kidney failure, blindness, leg pain and a loss of sensation in the feet. High sugar levels can also make healing from infections difficult.

If someone has type 2 diabetes, he or she should avoid sweetened drinks, sweets, breads, pastas and white race. Foods that are good for diabetics include fruit, vegetables, lean meats, fish, whole grains, beans and low-fat dairy.

Lexington Medical Center Expands 3-D Mammography

Because of a generous contribution from the Lexington Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary, the hospital’s mobile mammography unit now offers 3-D mammography for breast cancer screening services. The Volunteer Auxiliary donated nearly $375,000 to the Foundation’s Campaign for Clarity to upfit the unit with this lifesaving technology.

The Campaign for Clarity aims to make 3-D mammography available to every LMC patient. In just six months, the Foundation has raised more than $1 million! This success wouldn’t be possible without the support of the Foundation’s major campaign donors, special event sponsors and designated Universal Employee Fund donations.

To schedule the mobile mammography unit to visit your workplace, church or civic organization, call (803) 791 – 2486.

Currently, Lexington Medical Center also offers 3-D mammography at Women’s Imaging on the hospital campus in West Columbia and at Sandhills Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice in Northeast Columbia.

3-D Mammography Offers Clear Advantages
• Ability to detect much smaller lesions, as small as 2 millimeters, for earlier detection and diagnosis
• 41 percent increase in the detection of invasive breast cancers
• 29 percent increase in the detection of all breast cancers
• 15 percent reduction in patient callbacks due to suspicious findings that require additional images, reducing needless anxiety for these patients