Tag Archives: Lexington Medical Center Foundation

Rock Out for Pink Out

Thank you to Chapin’s Spring Hill High School students who raised more than $4,000 on Friday for the Lexington Medical Center Foundation’s breast cancer programs by selling t-shirts and collecting donations in their “Rock Out for Pink Out” fundraiser.

We were pleased to have Dr. Samantha Morton of Carolina Women’s Physicians and Barbara Willm of the Foundation there today to express our gratitude. Way to go!

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation provides many services for women with breast cancer including providing wigs, prosthetics and mastectomy bras as well as wellness workouts, medication and financial assistance. By providing a variety of programs, patients can focus on healing. Visit LMCFoundation.com

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. Today, Irby Schultz.

Irby Schultz, Lexington Medical Center Foundation Volunteer
Irby’s doctor found her breast cancer.

irby“I was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer 14 years ago, and I thank God every day for being a survivor.”

For Irby, relying on her faith and building support systems made a defining difference in how she transitioned from cancer patient to cancer survivor.

irby-schultz026a“After experiencing the support and compassion from all of the participants in the Pink Glove Dance video, I felt more connected to the community and grateful for the support of my fellow survivors. Seeing everyone in pink and wearing pink gloves is something I will always remember.”

She also stresses the importance of annual mammograms and self-breast exams.

Her advice to those starting their fight: “Keep a positive attitude, and remember the power of prayer.”

The Campaign for Clarity

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation plans to raise $3 million to make revolutionary new breast cancer equipment available throughout the hospital’s network of care. The Lexington Medical Center Foundation is about to launch the “Campaign for Clarity,” a capital campaign to upgrade all of its current mammography equipment to 3-D technology. 3-D mammography will become the standard of care at Lexington Medical Center.

3-D mammography at Lexington Medical Center

3-D mammography at Lexington Medical Center

Currently, Lexington Medical Center offers 3-D mammography in two locations — at Women’s Imaging on the main campus in West Columbia, and at Sandhills Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice in Northeast Columbia.

The campaign will allow the hospital to purchase software and equipment to make 3-D mammography also available at Vista Women’s Healthcare, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice; Lexington Medical Center Chapin; Lexington Medical Center Irmo; Lexington Medical Center Lexington; and in its mobile mammography van that serves local businesses and the hospital’s rural community medical centers.

Lexington Medical Center's Mobile Mammography Van

Lexington Medical Center’s Mobile Mammography Van

“We’re very excited to make 3-D mammography a reality for all patients at Lexington Medical Center,” said Barbara Willm, vice president of Community Relations and Development at Lexington Medical Center. “Until we can find a cure for breast cancer, we can make early detection our top priority.”

Also known as ‘tomosynthesis,’ 3-D mammography creates a group of three-dimensional pictures of the breast and allows doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time, making tiny details visible earlier and easier.

“Patients will find that 3-D mammography is no different from the mammogram they are accustomed to as far as compression, positioning and time,” said Jennifer Linfert, MD, FACOG, an OB/GYN at Sandhills Women’s Care. “The benefit to patients is that the multiple layers of images resulting from 3-D mammography can help doctors better evaluate the breast tissue.”

This infographic shows the difference between 2-D and 3-D images in the same breast. In the 3-D images, the area of concern is much easier to see.

This infographic shows the difference between 2-D and 3-D images in the same breast. In the 3-D images, the area of concern is much easier to see.

3-D mammography uses a low dose X-ray to create multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan. The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2-D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Studies have shown that 3-D mammography also reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

To learn more about the “Campaign for Clarity” or to contribute to the campaign, visit LMCFoundation.com or call (803) 791-2540.