Tag Archives: Lexington Medical Cancer Center

Understanding Breast Cancer Surgery

Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed type of cancer at Lexington Medical Center. In fact, statistics show 1 in 8 women will be diagnosed with breast cancer in her lifetime.

Thankfully, researchers and clinicians have learned a lot about the best ways to treat breast cancer and save lives. That includes knowing more about the best surgery methods. A generation ago, every woman with breast cancer received a double mastectomy. Today, surgeons have realized that less may be more – and it’s possible in some cases to perform a lumpectomy or use other treatment methods instead of a mastectomy.

Each month, WLTX hosts a segment called “Buddy Call.” It’s designed for women to remember to call a friend and remind her to perform a monthly self-breast exam. They also feature a patient or doctor. This month, they came to visit Dr. Richard Webb of Lexington Surgical Associates.

Celebrating its 28th anniversary this year, Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program is affiliated with Duke Health to provide state-of-the-art cancer care for cancer patients in our community. The hospital has treated more 5,000 women in the last 15 years, with a breast program accredited by the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC) and the American College of Radiology (ACR). Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program also has accreditation with commendation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.


For more information on cancer services at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Cancer.

McDaniels Gala and Golf Classic Raises $507,370 for 3-D Mammography

The 2018 McDaniels Automotive Group Gala and Golf Classic raised a record $507,370 for Lexington Medical Center’s Campaign for Clarity, a capital campaign to expand 3-D mammography throughout Lexington Medical Center’s network of care. The total is the highest amount raised in the event’s 26-year history.

“We are so proud that this event helps us make 3-D mammography a priority for all patients at Lexington Medical Center,” said Barbara Willm, vice president of Development and Community Relations at Lexington Medical Center. “This technology will have a significant impact on the health of our community.”

The two-day event on March 29 and 30 included a gala at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center and a golf tournament at the Fort Jackson Golf Club. More than 600 people attended the gala. And, 62 teams of four participated in the golf tournament. Both were sold out.

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“3-D mammography will detect breast cancer earlier and easier,” said Suzanne Pucci, president of Stanley Steemer of the Midlands and chair of the event. “Our ultimate goal is to save lives.”

The gala featured live and silent auctions, music by The Root Doctors and catering from the Blue Marlin. Live auction items at the gala include Hootie and the Blowfish Monday after the Masters tickets with VIP access; a party for 100 attendees at the Vista Room in Columbia with food, beer and wine from the Blue Marlin and live music; and a “Create Your Own Trip” package with a Ritz-Carlton hotel stay and international airline tickets. Silent auction items include a Live PD Ride Along; four tickets to see the Eagles; a Seabrook Island golf weekend; and a driving experience at the Porsche Experience Center in Atlanta.

“We’re making a difference fighting this dreadful disease,” said Bill McDaniels, president, owner and founder of McDaniels Automotive Group. “The impact is right here in our community with a local hospital.”

About 3-D Mammography

    Also known as ‘tomosynthesis,’ 3-D mammography creates a group of three-dimensional pictures of the breast and allows doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time, making tiny details visible earlier and easier.

    Patients will find that 3-D mammography is no different from the mammogram they are accustomed to as far as compression, positioning and time. The benefit to patients is that the multiple layers of images resulting from 3-D mammography can help doctors better evaluate the breast tissue.

    3-D mammography uses a low dose X-ray to create multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan. The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2-D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Studies have shown that 3-D mammography also reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

    To donate to Lexington Medical Center’s “Campaign for Clarity,” visit LMCFoundation.com.

Colorectal Cancer Month: Don’t Be Afraid to Talk to Your Doctor About Symptoms

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in South Carolina. Each year, more than 2,400 South Carolinians are diagnosed with colorectal cancer and approximately 800 die from the disease. But colorectal cancer is also one of the most preventable forms of cancer – and treatable when detected early.

Sometimes, colorectal cancer may not cause symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they may be bleeding, abdominal pain or a change in bowel habits. People with those symptoms should talk to their doctor. It might seem like an embarrassing topic, but as a Lexington Medical Center patient from Gilbert explains in this WIS-TV story, it could save your life.


Dr. Samir Shah of Lexington Surgical Associates, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, treated Joanne for colorectal cancer.

“Don’t delay having a colonoscopy,” Dr. Shah said. “It’s a painless procedure, and it’s better to be checked than to ignore an issue that could have been preventable and, most importantly, curable.”

A colonoscopy is considered one of the most powerful tools in clinical medicine because of its ability to identify and remove polyps before they become cancerous. Early detection and intervention can reduce mortality from colorectal cancer by up to 90 percent. Unfortunately, only 64 percent of the people in our state age 50 or older report ever being screened.

In general, people should have a colonoscopy at age 50. Patients with a family history of colorectal cancer should talk to their doctor and begin screening earlier.
While genetics may play a role in some colorectal cancer cases, most occur in someone with no family history of the disease. Factors that increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer include tobacco and heavy alcohol use, consumption of red or processed meat, diabetes, obesity and a low-fiber diet.

Lexington Medical Center diagnoses and treats more than 100 cases of colorectal cancer each year. From medical and radiation oncologists to surgeons, our clinicians provide comprehensive care for colorectal cancer. Visit LexMed.com/Cancer.