Tag Archives: Lexington Medical Cancer Center

Meet the Patients: A Breast Cancer Survivor Story

Beth Addison is a mom of two teenage girls. She was diagnosed with breast cancer one year ago after a 3-D mammogram at Lexington Medical Center.

She underwent a year of treatment that included chemotherapy at Lexington Oncology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

Beth also was featured as a model in our Women’s Night Out fashion show this year. The event honors breast cancer survivors and their families, and raises money for the Campaign for Clarity, a capital campaign to expand 3-D mammography throughout our hospital’s network of care.

In this WLTX news story, she shares her journey and what she learned along the way.

Lexington Medical Center diagnoses more than 250 cases of breast cancer each year. 3-D mammography is an important tool because it can reveal cancerous tumors when they are just 1 to 2 millimeters in size. Early detection is key to treating breast cancer. Visit LexMed.com/Cancer to learn more about our hospital’s cancer program.

Modern Management of Brain Tumors

Dr. Johnathan Engh is a neurosurgical oncologist at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. He specializes in tumors of the brain and spine. He talked about the latest treatment measures in this WLTX interview.

There are several types of brain tumors, typically divided between primary and metastatic brain tumors. A primary brain tumor grows from the brain itself; a metastatic brain tumor has spread to the brain from another part of the body. Some are malignant, others are benign. Brain surgeries can be complex.

According to Dr. Engh, brain tumors tend to present with headaches, confusion, an unexplained seizure as well as speech, memory and vision problems. Keep in mind the vast majority of headaches are not brain tumors.

Dr. Engh specializes in the most innovative ways to treat brain tumors. That includes minimally-invasive port surgery, a procedure that allows a surgeon to treat deep-seeded tumors while minimizing trauma to surrounding brain tissue.

Awake craniotomy, another innovative technique, maps the brain and allows the patient to participate in the surgery. If the patient is awake for a portion of the procedure, a doctor can ensure that speech and other neurological function is OK while the surgeon works on the tumor. There’s no machine that can do that. Awake brain surgery can maximize a patient’s outcome.

Finally, radiosurgery is a precise application of radiation without an incision and given on an outpatient basis. It can be very effective in shrinking tumors and preventing someone from needing surgery.

Dr. Engh’s expertise helps to allow people in the Midlands to receive world-class cancer care that’s close to home.

Tackling Breast Cancer and Rocking the Runway

Elizabeth Gainey lives in Lexington County with her husband. In the summer of 2017, she was 32 years old and just had a normal physical with her doctor. But a few weeks later, she noticed some unusual changes. At first, doctors thought it was an infection. But testing revealed breast cancer – and a positive result for the “BRCA1” gene – known to increase the risk of breast cancer. Elizabeth shared her story with WLTX this month.

Elizabeth’s did not experience a lump in her breast. Instead, she had redness, swelling and irritation. A biopsy revealed Stage 3 cancer. She underwent a double mastectomy, chemotherapy and radiation at Lexington Medical Center. Today, she’s finished her cancer treatment and is doing well. Her story emphasizes the importance of knowing your body, recognizing changes and speaking with your doctor promptly when you notice something different.

Elizabeth was one of 10 breast cancer survivors who were models at Women’s Night Out on October 16 – Lexington Medical Center’s annual event that honors breast cancer survivors and their families. Here are some photos of Elizabeth rocking the runway. She makes us proud.

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