Tag Archives: #JustSayKnow

“Just Say Know:” Talking to your Doctor About Heart Disease

Dr. Jeremy Crisp of Lexington Family Practice Northeast was a guest on WIS-TV this month to talk about conversations you should have with your primary care physician about heart disease. Watch his interview below, which includes information on ideal blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride readings.


HeartHealth_TheState_pub_pdf__page_11_of_12_

“Just Say Know” to Heart Disease: LMC is RED for February

Lexington Medical Center encourages community members to “Just Say Know” to heart disease during the month of February, which is American Heart Month. One out of every 3 people in South Carolina dies from cardiovascular disease. And, heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women in the world. Knowing your risk factors and how to prevent them can save your life.

Lexington Medical Center’s “Just Say Know” campaign emphasizes four main ways people can protect themselves against heart disease:

1. KNOW the risk factors.
2. KNOW when to talk to your doctor.
3. KNOW how to lower your risk.
4. KNOW when to call 9-1-1.

Risk factors for heart disease include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, smoking and a stressful lifestyle. Talking to your doctor about your heart, even if you’re healthy, is important. February is a perfect time to speak with your health care provider about your overall heart health, any concerns you may have, or questions you want to ask so that you can take control of your heart health.

During the month of February, Lexington Medical Center will be lit up at night with red lights to remind community members to “Just Say Know” to heart disease. This photo shows some of our employees outside of the “red hospital” last night.

RedHospital

To test your heart health knowledge, go to LexMed.com/Know to take an online quiz.

You can also schedule a hospital speaker to talk to your business, church group or organization about heart disease. Visit LexMed.com/Know or call Lexington Medical Center Community Outreach at (803) 936-8850.

Lexington Medical Center will host a FREE heart fair on Sunday, February 28 from Noon – 4:00 p.m. at the Columbia Metropolitan Convention Center in downtown Columbia. Attendees can walk through a MEGA inflatable heart, take an exercise class, and learn their blood pressure and Body Mass Index (BMI). Visitors can also learn about advanced technologies for heart care, meet Lexington Medical Center physicians and watch healthy cooking demonstrations.

New Treatment for Pulmonary Embolism

Have you heard of pulmonary embolism (PE)? It’s a blockage in one of the pulmonary arteries in your lungs.

In most cases, PE is caused by blood clots that travel to the lungs from the legs or other parts of the body, which is known as deep vein thrombosis.
These clots contribute to 100,000 deaths per year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lexington Medical Center now offers a new treatment option for patients suffering from PE — the EKOS EkoSonic® Endovascular System.

With this system, interventional cardiologists can deliver lower doses of thrombolytic, or clot-busting, medicines directly into the clots. Ultrasound pulses in the system are used to fragment the clot, helping the clot-busting drug to more effectively “melt” it away.

Massive PE diagnosed by computed tomography

Massive PE diagnosed by computed tomography

EKOS catheter inserted through the clot

EKOS catheter inserted through the clot

“While systemic thrombolysis relies on blood flow, which is very limited in completely blocked vessels, to deliver a larger dose of thrombolytic drug to the intact surface of the clot, catheter-directed thrombolysis uses catheters placed directly through the clots to deliver smaller doses of thrombolytic drug right into the middle of the clots,” said Robert Leonardi, MD, FACC, FSCAI, at Lexington Cardiology.

Dr. Leonardi talked about the procedure on WLTX recently.


“Catheter-directed thrombolysis helps patients recover from life-threatening PE more quickly and more completely by providing most or all of the benefit of full-dose, systemic thrombolysis with substantially less bleeding risk,” said Dr. Leonardi.

LMC performed its first catheter-directed thrombolysis for PE last year.

Risk Factors for Pulmonary Embolism
Even though anyone can develop blood clots and pulmonary embolism, certain factors increase your risk.

•Medical history
•Heart disease
•Certain cancers
•Prolonged immobility, such as bed rest and sitting during travel
•Surgery
•Smoking
•Obesity
•Supplemental estrogen, such as birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy
•Pregnancy