Tag Archives: heart disease

Lexington Cardiology Welcomes Christopher P. Rowley, MD

Lexington Medical Center proudly welcomes Christopher P. Rowley, MD, to its network of care at Lexington Cardiology. The board-certified cardiologists and highly skilled staff at the practice provide a variety of services to treat cardiovascular-related diseases.

Dr. Christopher Rowley

Dr. Rowley graduated magna cum laude from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Science in biochemisty and earned his medical degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He went on to complete his internal medicine internship and residency at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina.

While at Duke, Dr. Rowley participated in the Clinical Research Training Program, which is aimed at developing skills necessary to conduct medical research. He then completed cardiovascular disease and electrophysiology fellowships at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

Dr. Rowley is board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and clinical cardiac electrophysiology by the American Board of Internal Medicine. He is also a member of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society.

Prior to joining Lexington Medical Center’s network of care, he provided advanced cardiac electrophysiology services in Birmingham, Alabama. While there, Dr. Rowley served on the board of the American College of Cardiology’s Alabama Chapter as the early career representative, and his peers selected him to participate in the national ACC Leadership Academy.

Dr. Rowley is accepting new patients.

Lexington Cardiology has two convenient locations.

Columbia
90 Summit Centre Drive
Columbia, SC 29229
(803) 744-4900

West Columbia
2728 Sunset Boulevard, Suite 300
West Columbia, SC 29169
(803) 744-4940

LexCardio.com

Heart & Sole Women’s Five Miler

Nearly 1,300 women participated in the 16th annual Lexington Medical Center Heart & Sole Women’s Five Miler on Saturday, April 22 in Columbia. About 1/4 of them were Lexington Medical Center employees showing their commitment to a healthy lifestyle and raising awareness that heart disease is the #1 killer of women.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

We’re so pleased that WIS-TV partners with us for this wonderful event. Sports anchor Rick Henry was broadcasting live from the Finish line.

 

Our first runner came across in just over 30 minutes! That’s a six-minute-mile pace. Here’s her interview with Rick Henry.

 

Save the date for next year’s race! April 21, 2018. We’ll see you at the start line!
LexMed.com/Heart
#JustSayKnow

“The Widow-Maker”

Celebrity trainer Bob Harper recently suffered a type of heart attack called “the widow-maker.” He talked about it on The Today Show this week in this interview.

 

Dr. Brandon Drafts

So, what’s a “widow-maker?” And how does someone so passionate about health and fitness have a heart attack? We asked Dr. Brandon Drafts, cardiologist with Lexington Cardiology at Lexington Medical Center.

Q: What’s “the widow-maker?”
A: The “widow-maker” is a term used to describe a heart attack that occurs in the proximal portion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. The disease process or the sequence of events that leads to a heart attack is the same, but the location of the “widow-maker” is critical because of the large territory of heart muscle that is at risk, which could lead to cardiac arrest. It’s important to know that any heart attack can potentially be fatal, but the location of the “widow-maker” is very high risk.

Q: Bob Harper was a health and fitness fanatic, but also had a family history of heart disease. Are genetics alone enough to cause a heart attack, even if you’re healthy?
A: Yes, it’s possible that genetics can be the major factor leading to a heart attack. It’s uncommon, but we do see either severe heart disease or heart attacks that occur in very active people or even competitive athletes like marathon runners.

Genetics are complex, but basically involve deficiencies or mutations of certain genes that cause the coronary arteries to be more susceptible to the fatty plaque build-up that obstructs blood flow or can cause a sudden heart attack. Genetics can also refer to cardiac risk factors such as high cholesterol or diabetes that can be very difficult to control despite medical therapy.

So, it’s important to get established with a doctor who can monitor your blood pressure, cholesterol and weight over time.

Learn more about cardiovascular services at Lexington Medical Center by visiting LexMed.com/Heart.