Tag Archives: heart attack

LMC Opens First Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Irmo

With a strong commitment to meeting the needs of heart patients in our community, Lexington Medical Center has opened a new, state-of-the-art cardiac rehabilitation program on the Lexington Medical Center Irmo campus. The 2,500 square foot facility located inside the Irmo Medical Park at 7033 St. Andrews Rd. is the first cardiac rehabilitation facility in the Irmo area.

Cardiac Rehabilitation is a medically supervised program designed to optimize a cardiac patient’s physical, psychological and social functioning, in addition to stabilizing, slowing or even reversing the progression of cardiovascular disease.

People who benefit from cardiac rehabilitation include patients with a history of heart attack, angioplasty or stenting, heart valve surgery, heart transplant, angina, heart failure or heart bypass surgery.

Mark Stout inside LMC's Cardiac Rehabilitation facility in Irmo

Mark Stout inside LMC’s Cardiac Rehabilitation facility in Irmo

Studies show that cardiac rehabilitation participants experience a 31 to 46 percent reduction in death rates compared to non-participants. They also have a reduction in symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath and fatigue. And they report increased energy, improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, quicker returns to work and leisure activities, and a lower chance of experiencing another cardiac event.

“We’re bringing a great service to the people of the Irmo community,” said Mark Stout, supervisor of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Irmo. “If it’s more convenient, patients will attend more often. The medical professionals with expertise in cardiac rehabilitation are close to your home and your activities.”

Lexington Medical Center has offered cardiac rehabilitation at the main hospital in West Columbia for more than 20 years and at the hospital’s community medical center in Lexington since 2002.

Along with closely monitored exercise training, there are education classes addressing topics such as heart disease risk factors, healthy nutrition, weight management, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, managing diabetes, and understanding stress and your emotions.

“Cardiac rehabilitation provides better outcomes and better quality of life,” Stout said.

The need for heart care is clear in our state and our community. In South Carolina, one out of every three deaths is related to cardiovascular disease.

For more information about Cardiac Rehabilitation at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/heart.

Take 5 for Heart Health: Call 911

When someone is having a heart attack, is it better to call 911 for an ambulance or drive the person to the hospital yourself? In a segment on WIS-TV this week, Jamie Jeffcoat of LMC’s Center for Best Practice explained the answer.

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Learn more about the importance of calling 911 at our Heart Fair on Sunday, March 2 from 1:00 – 5:00 p.m. at the Doubletree by Hilton on Bush River Road in Columbia. It’s FREE and open to the public. Visit LexMed.com/Take5 to learn more.

Dr. Malanuk discusses Heart Attacks on WLTX

West Columbia, SC (WLTX)- According to the American Heart Association, 715,000 people in the United States will have a heart attack this year.

“It is the leading cause of death in America, heart attacks are number one, and if you combine all of the other risk of death they still don’t equal heart disease,” said Dr. Robert Malanuk.

Dr. Malanuk is a cardiologist at Lexington Medical Center, he spends his days and nights repairing hearts at the hospital.

“If you are smoking, not paying attention to your high blood pressure and if your weight is out of control, it is a matter of when you are going to have a heart attack because one in two American’s will be affected by heart disease.”

If you find yourself needing to help a heart attack patient, know you are working against a ticking time bomb.

“Take an asprin immediately and chew it up,” said Dr. Malanuk. “Secondly, call 911 and don’t delay. The earlier you can get to the emergency room, the better it is going to be for you.”

Some signs of a heart attack are the following symptoms: Chest pain, dizziness, shortness of breath and nausea.

Robert Malanuk, MD, FACC, is a cardiologist with Lexington Cardiology.