Tag Archives: Exercise

Wear Red Day

Did you remember to wear red today? Lexington Medical Center employees gathered to take a special photo today for Wear Red Day, a date designed to raise awareness that heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women in the United States.

Lexington Medical Center wants community members to “Just Say Know” to heart disease by learning their risk factors and talking to their doctors about ways to stay healthy.

Your goals should be:

Blood Pressure: Less than 120/80

Total Cholesterol: Less than 20

LDL Cholesterol (Bad Cholesterol): Less than 100 (Less than 70 if you have other risk factors)

HDL Cholesterol (Good Cholesterol): Greater than 60 is optimal. Less than 50 is a risk for women and less than 40 is a risk for men.

Triglycerides: Less than 150

Blood Glucose: Less than 100 (fasting value)

Body Mass Index (BMI): Less than 25

Daily Exercise: More than 30 minutes is ideal, but you should strive for at least 20 minutes.

Daily Relaxation: More than 30 minutes

Cigarettes Per Day: Zero (and no secondhand smoke)

For more information, visit LexMed.com/Know.

How A Lifetime of Bad Choices Leads to Heart Disease

We’re wrapping up American Heart Month with a visit with the doctor. Dr. Brandon Drafts of Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, talks about how a lifetime of bad choices can lead to heart disease in this WLTX interview you can watch below.


While are some risk factors we can’t control such our age or genetics, we CAN control diet, activity level, tobacco use, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

You should get about 30 minutes of exercise a day five days a week. Focus on a consistent, long-term exercise regimen with a progression in intensity.

Smomking can increase our risk for heart disease by causing fatty plaque buildup in the heart that can ultimately lead to heart attacks.

Blood pressure is the force blood exerts on the blood vessels. Ultimately, it can weaken the blood vessels or cause the heart to thicken, weakening the function of the heart.

Generally speaking, cholesterol is a good thing because cells need cholseterol to fucntion normally. Cholesterol becomes a problem when there’s an imbalance of it, which can lead to fatty buildup in the arteries.

Stress is a modifiable risk factor that doesn’t get as much attention as it should. It’s hard to objectify or measure stress. Indirectly, it can affect blood pressure or create unhealthy habits of dealing with stress like smoking or drinking alcohol. It can also make plaque buildup in the heart unsteady, which can lead to a heart attack.

Lexington Medical Center wants you to “Just Say Know” to heart disease. Visit LexMed.com/Know to take a heart health quiz and find more information.

Ask the Diabetes Educator: Exercise and Diabetes

This post is the first installment in a new blog series about diabetes. Do you have a question about diabetes for our expert? Ask in the comments section below and we will answer it.

Gwen Girdler, RN, BSN, CDE
Outpatient Diabetes Educator
Lexington Medical Center

Exercise plays a huge role in diabetes management. Aerobic exercise and/or resistance training can be as effective at lowering A1C as pharmacotherapy. Aerobic exercise 4-7 times/week for at least 30 minutes has a long list of benefits. A few examples of aerobic exercise include brisk walking, swimming, cycling and dancing.

©1998  EyeWire, Inc.

©1998 EyeWire, Inc.

Safety is important when beginning an exercise regimen. If you’re taking insulin or medications that can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), test your blood sugar 30 minutes before exercising and approximately every 30 minutes during exercise. That will help you determine if your blood sugar level is stable, rising or falling, and if it’s safe to keep exercising.

Blood sugar lower than 100 mg/dL may be too low to exercise safely. In that case, eat a small, carbohydrate-containing snack, such as peanut butter and crackers before you begin your workout. If you’re new to exercise, ease into it; start with 10 minutes of exercise at a time, gradually work up to 30 minutes a day, with two days of strength training.

Exercise Facts

1) Lowers your blood sugar
2) Improves insulin sensitivity, which means your body’s insulin works better
3) Lowers your risk for heart disease
4) Improves circulation
5) Helps to build and tone muscles and reduces body fat
6) Reduces stress and enhances quality of life