Tag Archives: Dr. Robert Leonardi

New Treatment for Pulmonary Embolism

Have you heard of pulmonary embolism (PE)? It’s a blockage in one of the pulmonary arteries in your lungs.

In most cases, PE is caused by blood clots that travel to the lungs from the legs or other parts of the body, which is known as deep vein thrombosis.
These clots contribute to 100,000 deaths per year, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Lexington Medical Center now offers a new treatment option for patients suffering from PE — the EKOS EkoSonic® Endovascular System.

With this system, interventional cardiologists can deliver lower doses of thrombolytic, or clot-busting, medicines directly into the clots. Ultrasound pulses in the system are used to fragment the clot, helping the clot-busting drug to more effectively “melt” it away.

Massive PE diagnosed by computed tomography

Massive PE diagnosed by computed tomography

EKOS catheter inserted through the clot

EKOS catheter inserted through the clot

“While systemic thrombolysis relies on blood flow, which is very limited in completely blocked vessels, to deliver a larger dose of thrombolytic drug to the intact surface of the clot, catheter-directed thrombolysis uses catheters placed directly through the clots to deliver smaller doses of thrombolytic drug right into the middle of the clots,” said Robert Leonardi, MD, FACC, FSCAI, at Lexington Cardiology.

Dr. Leonardi talked about the procedure on WLTX recently.


“Catheter-directed thrombolysis helps patients recover from life-threatening PE more quickly and more completely by providing most or all of the benefit of full-dose, systemic thrombolysis with substantially less bleeding risk,” said Dr. Leonardi.

LMC performed its first catheter-directed thrombolysis for PE last year.

Risk Factors for Pulmonary Embolism
Even though anyone can develop blood clots and pulmonary embolism, certain factors increase your risk.

•Medical history
•Heart disease
•Certain cancers
•Prolonged immobility, such as bed rest and sitting during travel
•Surgery
•Smoking
•Obesity
•Supplemental estrogen, such as birth control pills and hormone replacement therapy
•Pregnancy

“Holes in the Heart”

Join Lexington Medical Center cardiologist Robert A. Leonardi, MD, FACC in Sumter on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 for a free presentation called “Holes in the Heart.” The event is part of Lexington Medical Center’s quarterly patient education series in Sumter, featuring medical topics that are important to our community.

Dr. Robert Leonardi

Dr. Robert Leonardi

“Holes in the Heart” will take place on Tuesday, June 16, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. inside Sumter Cardiology at 540 Physicians Lane in Sumter.

Lexington Medical Center’s full range of cardiac services includes non-surgical closure for “holes in the heart” known as atrial septal defects (ASDs) and patent foramen ovale (PFO).

Courtesy: American Heart Association Heart.org

Courtesy: American Heart Association
Heart.org

ASD and PFO are congenital heart defects, meaning that people are born with them. Many patients are unaware of these “holes in the heart,” which can cause heart failure and have been associated with increased risk of stroke. Dr. Leonardi will discuss the problems these holes can cause, how they are diagnosed, and available treatments.

Affiliated with Duke Medicine, Lexington Medical Center offers comprehensive cardiovascular care with state-of-the-art technology. That includes open heart surgery, catheterizations, angioplasty, transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) to replace the aortic valve with a catheter instead of open heart surgery, and an electrophysiology program that diagnoses and treats abnormal heart rhythms known as cardiac arrhythmias.

Lexington Medical Center has full chest pain accreditation with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (SCPC), demonstrating its ability to quickly assess, diagnose and treat heart attack patients. And, the hospital is a Primary Stroke Center, excelling at treating stroke patients promptly.

Dr. Leonardi is a physician with Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

At the patient education presentation, light refreshments will be served. Attendees will have the opportunity to ask questions. For more information, visit LexMed.com

Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement

“Transcatheter aortic valve replacement is the most significant advancement in cardiology since coronary angioplasty.”

That’s what Lexington Medical Center cardiologist Dr. Robert Leonardi says about “TAVR,” a minimally invasive procedure that allows doctors to replace the heart’s aortic valve without open heart surgery.

In this video from WLTX, he explains TAVR.

Dr. Leonardi is one of the most experienced TAVR cardiologists in the Southeast and one of only a few fellowship-trained in transcatheter (non-surgical) valve procedures. A Greenville native, Dr. Leonardi earned his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He then completed an internal medicine residency at Duke University in Durham, N.C. and achieved board certification in this specialty. Dr. Leonardi finished his education with a cardiology fellowship at MUSC and fellowships in interventional cardiology and structural interventional cardiology at Emory University in Atlanta. He is also board certified in interventional cardiology and cardiovascular medicine.

By letting go of artificial boundaries between heart surgeons and interventional cardiologists, Lexington Medical Center is pleased to be using a collaborative, team-based approach to help patients with heart valve disease in our community. The team is made up of physicians from Lexington Cardiology and Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery. The hospital is proud to have performed the first fully percutaneous (no surgical incision) and first “awake” (without general anesthesia) TAVR procedures in South Carolina.

Dr. Leonardi is one of the 11 board-certified cardiologists at Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, dedicated to delivering the highest quality care in the treatment of cardiovascular disease.