Tag Archives: Dr. Heather Currier

February’s Physician Lecture Series: “Healing the Heart” with Dr. Heather M. Currier

February is American Heart Month. During this time, we are taking steps to raise awareness about heart health, and we can all encourage our family and friends to prevent heart disease. Heart disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, but there are many ways to prevent it, starting by being conscious of our health and living a heart healthy lifestyle.

On February 6, Lexington Medial Center cardiac surgeon, Dr. Heather M. Currier will be the featured speaker for this month’s Physician Lecture Series. Dr. Currier is a well-established cardiac surgeon, earning the 2014 “Award of Honor” by the American Board of Cardiology recognizing her work as a board consultant of cardiac surgery. She will be speaking on caring for yourself or a loved one after bypass surgery.

The event will be held at the Michael J. Beidiger Auditorium located in Lexington Medical Park 1 at 2728 Sunset Boulevard in West Columbia. The event is free to the public and includes health screenings beginning at 5pm. A heart healthy dinner will begin at 6pm with Dr. Currier’s lecture following at 6:45pm. To reserve your spot, call (803) 935-8260 by February 3rd.

Every year, nearly 500,000 people in the United States undergo coronary artery bypass surgery. To learn more about how to care for yourself or a loved one after bypass surgery, we hope you will join us on February 6.

Honoring America’s Bravest: Dr. Heather Currier

This week, Lexington Medical Center is proud to be the presenting sponsor of the Stephen Siller South Carolina Tunnel to Towers 5K Run and Walk, scheduled for Friday at 7:00 p.m. in Columbia’s Vista. This race is named for New York City firefighter Stephen Siller, who lost his life while trying to save others on September 11, 2001. It honors all first responders and military members for their service and sacrifice.

Several Lexington Medical Center physicians have served in the military, including Heather Currier, MD, FACCP, cardiothoracic surgeon with Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. Dr. Currier retired from the United States Army this year after 24 years of distinguished military service.

Dr. Currier’s military career began when she attended the United States Air Force Academy in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

“I wanted to go to school with people who were smart and also honorable,” she said. “I liked being around people who wanted to serve our country.”

She earned her undergraduate degree in biochemistry with honors there and then received her medical degree from the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences in Bethesda, Maryland where she was awarded with outstanding performance distinction in surgery.

She completed a general surgery residency at Brooke Army Medical Center at Fort Sam Houston, Texas, and a cardiothoracic surgery fellowship at Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washington, DC.

During her career, Dr. Currier deployed for combat tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. There, she worked as a trauma surgeon for military service members injured in battle. She treated soldiers with overwhelmingly catastrophic injuries and loss of limbs.

Her job titles in combat included Chief of Surgery, Deputy Commander of Surgical Services and Chief of Surgery.

At the conclusion of Dr. Currier’s deployments, the United States awarded her with the Oak Leaf Cluster, Army Commendation Medal and the National Defense Service Ribbon.

Dr. Currier retired as a colonel from the United States Army earlier this year, while serving as the chief of Cardiothoracic Surgery at Eisenhower Army Medical Center in Fort Gordon, Georgia and Charlie Norwood Veteran Affairs Medical Center in Augusta, Georgia. She started working at Lexington Medical Center in February.

Dr. Heather Currier

Each year around the time of the Tunnel to Towers race, Dr. Currier thinks about the patients she treated in combat and of the team of clinicians who helped save the lives of America’s Bravest.

“We were all willing to die for a cause we believed in,” she said. “And that makes me proud.”

If you’d like to run or walk in this year’s Tunnel to Towers race, register by going to www.T2TRunSC.org.