Tag Archives: Dawndy Mercer-Plank

Can Thyroid Cancer Lead to Heart Problems?

If you’ve had thyroid cancer or even thyroid problems, you may be taking a synthetic thyroid hormone.

Now, a new medical study says that the risk of heart disease and stroke is higher in thyroid cancer patients who take a synthetic thyroid hormone.

How concerned should thyroid patients be?

Dr. Melanie Seybt of Lexington ENT & Allergy, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, answered the question in this WIS Health U report.

According to Dr. Seybt, thyroid cancer patients are typically dosed with synthetic thyroid hormone a bit higher. When there’s a higher level of thyroid hormone in the body, it can cause some cardiac arrhythmias or increased work on the heart. So, it’s important that all patients have the right amount of synthetic thyroid hormone. In year’s past, some patients thought that taking more thyroid supplementation could boost their metabolism and help them lose weight. That’s true, but it would put more pressure on the heart.

The bottom line is that it’s important for patients on thyroid supplementation to talk to their doctor about heart disease and be aware of other heart disease risk factors including high cholesterol, high blood pressure and being overweight.

To learn more about Dr. Seybt and her Lexington ENT & Allergy, visit www.ENTLexington.com

Hey Girlfriends! Register for Heart and Sole

On your mark, get set, go! Join us for the Lexington Medical Center Heart and Sole Women’s Five Miler on Saturday, April 21 in downtown Columbia. This women-only event features a five-mile run, a five-mile walk and a three-mile-walk. In its 17th year, Heart and Sole is designed to celebrate women and the power of a healthy lifestyle, and to raise awareness that heart disease is the #1 killer of women. With a strong commitment to a comprehensive cardiovascular program at hospital, Lexington Medical Center is pleased to be the title sponsor.

The start line is at Arsenal Hill on Laurel Street. The opening ceremony is at 7:30 a.m; the 5-mile run and walk begin at 8:00 a.m; and the 3-mile walk starts at 8:05 a.m. The finish line is at the bottom of Finlay Park on Taylor Street. Each woman will receive a red rose and a finisher’s medal as she crosses the finish line. A post-event celebration and expo featuring Lexington Medical Center clinicians as well as WIS-TV news anchors Dawndy Mercer-Plank, Judi Gatson and other WIS-TV personalities will take place in Finlay Park until 10:30 a.m.

“We’re proud to host the Heart and Sole Women’s Five Miler because it not only encourages physical activity a healthy lifestyle, it also calls attention to the issue of heart disease — the biggest health threat women face today,” said Dr. Amy Epps, cardiologist with Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

Launched by the Carolina Marathon Association in 2002, the Lexington Medical Center Heart and Sole Women’s Five Miler is South Carolina’s first women-only road race. It has grown from fewer than 400 female participants in its first year to more than 1,300 today. Sponsored in conjunction with WIS-TV, the race offers women of all athletic abilities the opportunity to participate in a comforting, supportive environment. Elite athletes, as well as first-timers, enjoy the unique event.

Women who have participated in Heart and Sole in previous years will recognize changes in the course this year. The growth of Columbia’s Soda City Market on Main Street has made the downtown area on Saturday mornings busier than ever before. As a result, the course will now go down Marion Street, incorporate historic sections of the city and eliminate the Gervais Street hill. These changes will create a flatter, faster course. Additionally, the race will begin 30 minutes earlier than previous years.

For more information, including a course map, packet pick-up, race day and awards information, and to register, visit HeartAndSolerun.com or HeartAndSoleWalk.com.

We hope to see you at the start line!

The Trouble with Sitting Too Much

Many of us have jobs that require us to sit in front of a desk for hours at at a time each day, without getting up to stretch or walk around. In this WIS-TV news story. Dana Rawl, MD, of Occupational Health at Lexington Medical Center, explains the health detriments of sitting too much – and what you can do to fix it.

 

For more information, visit the Occupational Health website by clicking here.