Tag Archives: cardiac rehabilitation

LMC Opens First Cardiac Rehabilitation Program in Irmo

With a strong commitment to meeting the needs of heart patients in our community, Lexington Medical Center has opened a new, state-of-the-art cardiac rehabilitation program on the Lexington Medical Center Irmo campus. The 2,500 square foot facility located inside the Irmo Medical Park at 7033 St. Andrews Rd. is the first cardiac rehabilitation facility in the Irmo area.

Cardiac Rehabilitation is a medically supervised program designed to optimize a cardiac patient’s physical, psychological and social functioning, in addition to stabilizing, slowing or even reversing the progression of cardiovascular disease.

People who benefit from cardiac rehabilitation include patients with a history of heart attack, angioplasty or stenting, heart valve surgery, heart transplant, angina, heart failure or heart bypass surgery.

Mark Stout inside LMC's Cardiac Rehabilitation facility in Irmo

Mark Stout inside LMC’s Cardiac Rehabilitation facility in Irmo

Studies show that cardiac rehabilitation participants experience a 31 to 46 percent reduction in death rates compared to non-participants. They also have a reduction in symptoms such as chest pain, shortness of breath and fatigue. And they report increased energy, improvements in blood pressure, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, quicker returns to work and leisure activities, and a lower chance of experiencing another cardiac event.

“We’re bringing a great service to the people of the Irmo community,” said Mark Stout, supervisor of Cardiac Rehabilitation in Irmo. “If it’s more convenient, patients will attend more often. The medical professionals with expertise in cardiac rehabilitation are close to your home and your activities.”

Lexington Medical Center has offered cardiac rehabilitation at the main hospital in West Columbia for more than 20 years and at the hospital’s community medical center in Lexington since 2002.

Along with closely monitored exercise training, there are education classes addressing topics such as heart disease risk factors, healthy nutrition, weight management, controlling blood pressure and cholesterol, managing diabetes, and understanding stress and your emotions.

“Cardiac rehabilitation provides better outcomes and better quality of life,” Stout said.

The need for heart care is clear in our state and our community. In South Carolina, one out of every three deaths is related to cardiovascular disease.

For more information about Cardiac Rehabilitation at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/heart.

“Heart” With a Little Help from Our Friends

“Where’s your heart?”

That’s what Barbara Brown’s grandchildren asked her after she had open heart surgery at Lexington Medical Center.

They were talking about the heart-shaped pillow that each heart surgery patient receives. Members of the patient’s care team sign it. And, sometimes, the surgeon draws on the pillow to explain the patient’s condition and how to fix it.

“The heart was a lifesaver,” Brown said. “I’d hug it after surgery and it made me feel more secure.”

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation provides the heart pillows, which are designed to support the chest when
patients cough or sneeze after surgery and to help them remember not to use their arms when standing and walking.

The pillows add some emotional comfort, too.

LMC_010914_0118The retired Lexington County middle school math teacher’s heart troubles began early in 2013 when she experienced pain running down her arm while on a treadmill. She was also borderline diabetic, had high cholesterol and a history of heart disease in her family.

The problems multiplied one day when she was walking at Riverbanks Botanical Garden in Columbia with a friend.

“It felt like there was an elephant on my chest.” And her face was as pale as a ghost.

A cardiac catheterization at Lexington Medical Center revealed two blocked arteries. Brown underwent open heart surgery at the hospital on July 18, 2013, two days before her 63rd birthday.

After surgery, she began the hospital’s Cardiac Rehabilitation program, taking classes about nutrition and healthy eating, and working out on treadmills, bikes and elliptical machines in Lexington Medical Center’s nationally accredited cardiac rehabilitation facility.

“The thing I liked most was knowing that I was being monitored,” Brown said. “I felt confident knowing they were watching me.”

Statistics show that cardiac rehabilitation participants experience a 34 to 46 percent reduction in death rates compared to non-participants. Benefits also include reduced symptoms, increased energy, quicker return to work and leisure activities, and improved quality of life.

Cardiac rehabilitation is so important that the Lexington Medical Center Foundation offers scholarships to people in need who do not have the resources to pay for it. And the hospital’s Foundation pays for a DVD library to educate cardiac rehabilitation patients, flat screen televisions for the gym and waiting area, scales for patients to use at home, and tuition for smoking cessation classes.

These days, Brown eats healthy, keeps a food journal and exercises 30 minutes daily. She also takes care of two of her grandchildren two days per week. They like to play “hospital” in her house and hand her the heart pillow.

“You need your heart,” they tell her.

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation provides important programs and services that help people in our community, including cancer patients. Please consider giving to the Lexington Medical Center Foundation during the Central Carolina Community Foundation’s “Midlands Gives” challenge on May 5. Learn more at MidlandsGives.org.

Take 5 for Heart Health: Chill Out!

Stress can hurt our hearts. That’s why important to learn ways that we can “Chill Out!” Mark Stout of Lexington Medical Center Cardiac Rehabilitation talked about stress management in this “Take 5 for Heart Health” segment on WIS-TV with Dawndy Mercer Plank.

A few important notes from Mark:

~Stress can cause your blood vessels to constrict and become smaller, and ultimately cause a heart attack.

~Realize that everyone has some type of stress in their life. But if you carry it around with you, it can be harmful.

~Identify the stressors in your life.

~Find a way to relax and manage stress: deep breathing, yoga, meditation, listening to soft music or exercise are great examples.

Learn more about managing stress at our FREE Heart Fair on Sunday, March 1 from Noon – 4:00 p.m. at the DoubleTree by Hilton on Bush River Road. Learn more at LexMed.com/Take5