Tag Archives: Cancer

Quit Smoking in 2019: Free Smoking Cessation Classes

Are you trying to quit smoking in the New Year? Lexington Medical Center is pleased to offer a series of free smoking cessation classes to members of our community who want to kick the smoking habit for good.

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The classes, offered at hospital locations around Lexington County, meet once each week for two hours and last eight weeks. The Freedom from Smoking program is open to anyone who wants to quit smoking, and because of a generous grant from the Lexington Medical Center Foundation, there is no cost to participate.

The first session of classes begins on Tuesday, January 8, 2019 from 6:00 – 8:00 p.m. inside Lexington Medical Center Lexington at 811 West Main Street in Lexington. Additional sessions will begin in March in Irmo, May in Lexington, July in West Columbia and September in Lexington and Batesburg-Leesville. Tobacco cessation facilitators who have training from the American Lung Association lead the classes.

Since its inception, 55 percent of the people who completed the smoking cessation program through Lexington Medical Center have quit smoking. That’s significantly above the national average of 17 to 23 percent. The classes provide helpful tips for quitting.

The program doesn’t end with the completion of the eight-week course. The clinicians leading the classes check on each participant at 30-, 90-, 180- and 365-day intervals for the first year.

To register, call (803) 358-6180. You must register for the class in advance.

For long-time smokers, Lexington Medical Center also offers a lung cancer screening program. Detecting lung cancer at an early stage can reduce the risk of mortality by 20 percent. People who meet the following criteria should consider a lung cancer screening:
~55-74 years old and a heavy smoker (the equivalent of a pack a day for 30 years)
~55-74 years old and at risk because of family history, your occupation or a lung disease
~Symptoms, like a continuous cough, shortness of breath or coughing up blood

The scan takes 15-20 seconds. If clinicians find a spot, the patient’s doctor may request another CT scan or biopsy to determine if the abnormality is cancer.

If the patient is still a smoker at the time of the screening, nurses will provide education and resources to help them quit.

For more information on the hospital’s lung cancer screening program or to schedule an appointment, call (803) 791 – 2000.

Colorectal Cancer Month: Don’t Be Afraid to Talk to Your Doctor About Symptoms

March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. Colorectal cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in South Carolina. Each year, more than 2,400 South Carolinians are diagnosed with colorectal cancer and approximately 800 die from the disease. But colorectal cancer is also one of the most preventable forms of cancer – and treatable when detected early.

Sometimes, colorectal cancer may not cause symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they may be bleeding, abdominal pain or a change in bowel habits. People with those symptoms should talk to their doctor. It might seem like an embarrassing topic, but as a Lexington Medical Center patient from Gilbert explains in this WIS-TV story, it could save your life.


Dr. Samir Shah of Lexington Surgical Associates, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, treated Joanne for colorectal cancer.

“Don’t delay having a colonoscopy,” Dr. Shah said. “It’s a painless procedure, and it’s better to be checked than to ignore an issue that could have been preventable and, most importantly, curable.”

A colonoscopy is considered one of the most powerful tools in clinical medicine because of its ability to identify and remove polyps before they become cancerous. Early detection and intervention can reduce mortality from colorectal cancer by up to 90 percent. Unfortunately, only 64 percent of the people in our state age 50 or older report ever being screened.

In general, people should have a colonoscopy at age 50. Patients with a family history of colorectal cancer should talk to their doctor and begin screening earlier.
While genetics may play a role in some colorectal cancer cases, most occur in someone with no family history of the disease. Factors that increase the risk of developing colorectal cancer include tobacco and heavy alcohol use, consumption of red or processed meat, diabetes, obesity and a low-fiber diet.

Lexington Medical Center diagnoses and treats more than 100 cases of colorectal cancer each year. From medical and radiation oncologists to surgeons, our clinicians provide comprehensive care for colorectal cancer. Visit LexMed.com/Cancer.

Our New Cancer Commercial

We are pleased to present our new Lexington Medical Cancer Center commercial. Affiliated with Duke Health, our hospital’s cancer program provides comprehensive care among a variety of specialties with state-of-the-art technology and unsurpassed compassion. If you have cancer, we believe “It’s Our Fight, Too.”


#ItsOurFightToo