Tag Archives: Breast Cancer

Pink Glove Video Dance

By: Crissie Miller Kirby

Over the last year I have been so blessed in having been chosen as one of the Every Woman bloggers.  I have had a chance to pursue my lifelong dream of writing and have had the chance to meet some wonderful people and gain much self confidence through this endeavor.  However, few things can match being asked to participate in the Lexington Medical Center’s video for the 2nd annual Pink Glove Dance competition.

As soon as the email came in inviting the bloggers, I knew I wanted to be in attendance.  For those of you who may not know, the Pink Glove Dance is a competition is sponsored by the medical supply company, Medline; the winner of which will choose a breast cancer research foundation to receive a $10,000 donation.  And if you missed the big news from last year, our own Lexington Medical Center was the inaugural competition’s winner, securing the $10,000 for the Vera Bradley Foundation.

Breast cancer is a devastating and debilitating disease.  It knows no boundaries; striking young and old; black and white; even male and female.  My mother-in-law was diagnosed with it shortly before my oldest son was born in 2005; almost seven years later she is cancer free.  One of my dearest friends was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 at the relatively young age of 40; almost three years later, she, too, is cancer free.  In 2011, this same friend asked me to join her in participating in a Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer walk in Florida.  What an honor and awesome experience it was for me to walk beside her and watch her cross the finish line after all she had been through.  Being able to participate in the Pink Glove Dance was another way for me to honor these two ladies in my life and all those who have battled breast cancer.

Fast forward to the day of the taping of the finale sequence of the dance; when I arrived at the hospital locale for the shoot, I stood back in awe of the number of people in attendance.  Young, old, male, female; just as breast cancer knows no boundaries, those wanting to stand up in the fight against it knew no boundaries either.  There were doctors and nurses; hospital staff; and even a hospital chaplain who clearly had to have been in the roughly 70-year-age range (he impressed me the most as he stayed and danced the entire 4 hours in a clergy collar, no less).

As rehearsals began, I was reminded of just how terribly uncoordinated I was; in the end, it made no difference because we were all learning the moves together, for a common cause.  As daylight turned into dusk and then darkness, the site was illuminated with energy (and some really big flood lights).  We pressed on, encouraged continually by the choreographer and director.  The atmosphere was absolutely phenomenal and unmatched by just about anything I have witnessed in my 34 years.

During one of the breaks, I remember telling Jennifer Wilson how neat it was to see the breast cancer survivors themselves, many of whom had been highlighted by name in last year’s video.  They truly were the stars of the night; and rightfully so.  Their untiring and unwavering spirit was evidence of what they truly must have gone through during their battles with this dreaded disease.  I think it helped to motivate all of us; I know it did me.

As the filming drew to a close, I looked around at all of the people present for this undertaking and reflected on what a wonderful and moving experience it had been for me, personally.  To be surrounded by so many people all fighting for a common cause without regard to race, gender, religion; it was truly an inspiring event.

Once upon a time, breast cancer was hard to detect and treat.  Today, depending on stage of detection, some breast cancer survival rates near 100%.  Obviously, early detection and treatment are key in continuing to increase the survival rates. However, new and more effective treatments are continually needed and this is what the Pink Glove Dance represents – a chance to utilize funding to assist in research, development, and testing so that maybe one day, breast cancer will be nothing more than a memory of days gone by.

In closing, obviously, we would LOVE to see a repeat win for Lexington Medical Center in the Pink Glove Dance Competition! This year’s video is set to the encouraging song “Part of Me” by Katy Perry, and chronicles the breast cancer battle of one of Lexington Medical Center’s own nurses.  Voting will begin on Friday, October 12th.  Be on the lookout on Facebook for the video’s debut.  Make sure to “Like” it, share it and help Lexington Medical Center secure another $10,000 donation to the Vera Bradley Foundation!

Good Luck LMC!  Job well done!

LMC Receives Prestigious Breast Cancer Accreditation

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Mobile Mammography Van

LMC Mobile Mammography Van

Lexington Medical Center has received a prestigious accreditation from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers (NAPBC). The organization is praising Lexington Medical Center for its commitment to providing the highest quality evaluation and management of patients with breast disease.

The NAPBC measured Lexington Medical Center’s breast cancer program by looking at 27 standards of care established by the NAPBC that collectively provide the most efficient and contemporary care available for patients.

The measured standards in the accreditation process included the presence of board-certified surgeons and oncologists, nurse navigators, digital mammography, breast MRI, support programs and services, community outreach and clinical trials. Lexington Medical Center applied to be surveyed for accreditation because the hospital wants to ensure it is providing the highest level of care possible for breast cancer, a disease that affects approximately 1 in 8 women. Currently, only seven hospitals in South Carolina have the NAPBC accreditation.
“Congratulations on your center’s dedication to the care of your patients,” said Scott Kurtzman, MD, chairman of the NAPBC Standards and Accreditation Committee in a letter to Lexington Medical Center.

Lexington Medical Center’s breast program is also accredited by the American College of Radiology (ACR). Lexington Medical Center has four Women’s Imaging Centers and a state-of-the-art digital mobile mammography van that travels throughout the Midlands. Through an innovative program known as “Five Day Detection to Diagnosis,” Lexington Medical Center provides answers about the health of a woman’s breast within five days after detection of a lump or abnormality. Lexington Medical Center works closely with women and their families throughout cancer treatment. “Becky’s Place” is a boutique located inside the hospital that offers wigs, mastectomy bras and prostheses. Breast cancer patients also receive the assistance of a nurse navigator who provides education and emotional support.

Meet LMC’s New Mobile Mammography Van

LMC Mammovan 2010Lexington Medical Center has a new, state-of-the-art, mobile mammography van that will travel throughout the Midlands providing mammograms to the community.

Lexington Medical Center will host an open house and tour of the van on Thursday, April 29, 2010 from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. in the Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium, 2728 Sunset Boulevard, West Columbia, S.C.

The new 43-foot van features electric steps with a porch and awning as well as updated modern décor such as hardwood floors, leather seats, a banquette, window treatments and two dressing rooms. The porch makes entering and exiting the van easier for patients and staff, and because it has two dressing rooms, patients are able to move more efficiently. Also, the cab is more open, creating a more comfortable space for patients and technologists.

Importantly, the van provides digital mammography, which can detect spots as small as a grain of sand.

The Lexington Medical Center Volunteer Auxiliary donated the van to Lexington Medical Center. The LMC Foundation will also be supporting the mobile mammography van by funding its maintenance and purchasing items such as a laptop computer for patient registration and a GPS system.

The new van will replace the hospital’s existing one, which has provided quality mammography services for the past 11 years.

“The mobile mammography van will provide the same quality mammography services for women at their work place, which will reduce their time away from work,” says Frankie Haygood, mammography supervisor. The van travels to approximately 84 sites around the Midlands including community medical centers, Lexington Family Practice locations, schools and businesses. Last year, approximately 2,500 patients received mobile mammography services.

The new van is even serving as a benchmark to other health care organizations around the country. Farber, the company that manufactured the van, will feature it at the Radiological Society of North America convention in November.