Tag Archives: Breast Cancer

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. Today, Lisa Phillips.

Lisa Phillips, Lexington Oncology Infusion Center
Lisa has been a breast cancer survivor since October 2009 when she was diagnosed with high grade, poorly differentiated, atypical invasive ductal carcinoma, stage IIA.

lisa“I completed chemotherapy and underwent a bilateral mastectomy in 2010. My treatment was a complete success, and there was absolutely no cancer at the time of surgery.”

Lisa discovered her cancer through a self-breast exam, but she also had a family history of breast cancer.

lisa-phillips050a“Within five years, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer in both breasts, and mammograms detected her cancer both times. My great-grandmother and great aunt also had breast cancer. Self-breast exams and mammograms can save your life.”

In the five years since Lexington Medical Center’s first Pink Glove Dance, Lisa has used her experience battling cancer to better care for patients, encouraging them to believe in themselves.

“Look for joy in every day, and I believe it will change your perspective on your journey.”

Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, read their stories and find out where they are today. In today’s post, Harriet Horton.

Harriet Horton
Lexington Medical Center Vice President

Doctors detected Harriet’s breast cancer through an annual mammogram.

harriet“If I had not been having annual mammograms, my cancer would never have been detected. The self-breast exam is important; however, I never felt anything, and neither did my physicians during my annual physical exams.”

Diagnosed with stage 2 lobular breast cancer in late January 2010 through Lexington Medical Center’s Five Day Detection to Diagnosis program, she participated in the hospital’s Pink Glove Dance only 12 months later.

harriet-horton029a“It felt like all my co-workers were behind me in what I and the other ladies had gone through. It truly made me realize there is life after being diagnosed with breast cancer.”

Harriet’s message for people facing cancer is one of hope.

“As I encounter newly diagnosed cancer patients (whether breast or otherwise), I feel the need to encourage them. I share my experience and tell them there is life after cancer and even during cancer.”

To watch Lexington Medical Center’s 2011 Pink Glove Dance video, click on this link for the hospital’s You Tube channel.

The Campaign for Clarity

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation plans to raise $3 million to make revolutionary new breast cancer equipment available throughout the hospital’s network of care. The Lexington Medical Center Foundation is about to launch the “Campaign for Clarity,” a capital campaign to upgrade all of its current mammography equipment to 3-D technology. 3-D mammography will become the standard of care at Lexington Medical Center.

3-D mammography at Lexington Medical Center

3-D mammography at Lexington Medical Center

Currently, Lexington Medical Center offers 3-D mammography in two locations — at Women’s Imaging on the main campus in West Columbia, and at Sandhills Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice in Northeast Columbia.

The campaign will allow the hospital to purchase software and equipment to make 3-D mammography also available at Vista Women’s Healthcare, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice; Lexington Medical Center Chapin; Lexington Medical Center Irmo; Lexington Medical Center Lexington; and in its mobile mammography van that serves local businesses and the hospital’s rural community medical centers.

Lexington Medical Center's Mobile Mammography Van

Lexington Medical Center’s Mobile Mammography Van

“We’re very excited to make 3-D mammography a reality for all patients at Lexington Medical Center,” said Barbara Willm, vice president of Community Relations and Development at Lexington Medical Center. “Until we can find a cure for breast cancer, we can make early detection our top priority.”

Also known as ‘tomosynthesis,’ 3-D mammography creates a group of three-dimensional pictures of the breast and allows doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time, making tiny details visible earlier and easier.

“Patients will find that 3-D mammography is no different from the mammogram they are accustomed to as far as compression, positioning and time,” said Jennifer Linfert, MD, FACOG, an OB/GYN at Sandhills Women’s Care. “The benefit to patients is that the multiple layers of images resulting from 3-D mammography can help doctors better evaluate the breast tissue.”

This infographic shows the difference between 2-D and 3-D images in the same breast. In the 3-D images, the area of concern is much easier to see.

This infographic shows the difference between 2-D and 3-D images in the same breast. In the 3-D images, the area of concern is much easier to see.

3-D mammography uses a low dose X-ray to create multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan. The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2-D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Studies have shown that 3-D mammography also reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

To learn more about the “Campaign for Clarity” or to contribute to the campaign, visit LMCFoundation.com or call (803) 791-2540.