Tag Archives: breast cancer survivors

Support Groups for Breast Cancer Patients

Lexington Medical Center offers a number of support groups for patients with cancer. Meeting with fellow cancer patients and families can help alleviate stress and depression, and educate families about their cancer journey. The support groups are also free for anyone to attend, even if they did not receive their cancer treatment at Lexington Medical Center.

The first group is called “Coping with Cancer Together.” It’s for anyone diagnosed with cancer and meets at the hospital on Wednesday mornings.

The second group is “Sharing Hope.” It’s for women with recurrent or metastatic breast cancer. With the group run by a Lexington Medical Center breast cancer nurse navigator, patients gather and draw support from others.

This month, WLTX came to a Sharing Hope meeting to learn more about how the group helps patients. Here is the story.

To learn more about “Coping with Cancer Together” and “Sharing Hope,” click here.

Lexington Medical Center offers other support groups, too. To learn more about them, click here.

Overcoming Breast Cancer

Each month, Lexington Medical Center partners with WLTX to help with the TV station’s “Buddy Call” segment. That’s when news anchors Darci Strickland and Andrea Mock profile a breast cancer survivor and tell women to call a “buddy” and remind her to do a self-breast exam. This month, their story focused on Janie Lakin.

In addition to being an 8-year cancer survivor, Janie was a model in the 2018 breast cancer survivor fashion show during Women’s Night Oct, Lexington Medical Center’s annual event recognizing October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month. Here are sone photos of Janie on the catwalk.

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Shall We Dance? Pink Glove Dancer Update

Five years ago, a group of women danced in Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance because they had a tomorrow. They had survived breast cancer. In this blog series, find out where they are today. First, Amy Kinard.

Amy Kinard
River Bluff High School Nurse

At just 34 years old, Amy found a lump during a routine self-breast exam. At the time, she was a nurse at Lexington Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

amy-k“That self-breast exam helped me detect my cancer early, which made my treatment and prognosis better.”

She was diagnosed with invasive ductal carcinoma in-situ, stage 1 with no lymph node involvement. While her cancer was not progesterone or estrogen driven, she tested positive for an overexpression of HER2-Nu, a protein that makes cancer more aggressive. Amy had no family history of cancer, and her genetic testing was negative.

amy-kinard009b“I strongly encourage all women to do self-breast exams, get their annual mammogram, be familiar with their bodies and see their doctor immediately if they notice the slightest change. You have to be your own biggest advocate.”

Amy has been a survivor for nine years now. Today, she’s a nurse at River Bluff High School.

“Five years after filming the Pink Glove Dance, people still recognize me and make the connection with the video. I am proud of the work Lexington Medical Center did to bring awareness to breast cancer and the impact it had on our community. These are memories I will cherish for a lifetime.”

To watch Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance from 2011, visit this link on the hospital’s You Tube channel.