Tag Archives: blood pressure

Wear Red Day

Did you remember to wear red today? Lexington Medical Center employees gathered to take a special photo today for Wear Red Day, a date designed to raise awareness that heart disease is the #1 killer of men and women in the United States.

Lexington Medical Center wants community members to “Just Say Know” to heart disease by learning their risk factors and talking to their doctors about ways to stay healthy.

Your goals should be:

Blood Pressure: Less than 120/80

Total Cholesterol: Less than 20

LDL Cholesterol (Bad Cholesterol): Less than 100 (Less than 70 if you have other risk factors)

HDL Cholesterol (Good Cholesterol): Greater than 60 is optimal. Less than 50 is a risk for women and less than 40 is a risk for men.

Triglycerides: Less than 150

Blood Glucose: Less than 100 (fasting value)

Body Mass Index (BMI): Less than 25

Daily Exercise: More than 30 minutes is ideal, but you should strive for at least 20 minutes.

Daily Relaxation: More than 30 minutes

Cigarettes Per Day: Zero (and no secondhand smoke)

For more information, visit LexMed.com/Know.

When Does Your Heart Need a Checkup?

We have routine mammograms, colonoscopies and dental check ups. But how do we know for sure our hearts are healthy? Dr. Amy Epps of Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, answers that question in this WIS Health U news report with Dawndy Mercer-Plank.

 

“The Widow-Maker”

Celebrity trainer Bob Harper recently suffered a type of heart attack called “the widow-maker.” He talked about it on The Today Show this week in this interview.

 

Dr. Brandon Drafts

So, what’s a “widow-maker?” And how does someone so passionate about health and fitness have a heart attack? We asked Dr. Brandon Drafts, cardiologist with Lexington Cardiology at Lexington Medical Center.

Q: What’s “the widow-maker?”
A: The “widow-maker” is a term used to describe a heart attack that occurs in the proximal portion of the left anterior descending (LAD) artery. The disease process or the sequence of events that leads to a heart attack is the same, but the location of the “widow-maker” is critical because of the large territory of heart muscle that is at risk, which could lead to cardiac arrest. It’s important to know that any heart attack can potentially be fatal, but the location of the “widow-maker” is very high risk.

Q: Bob Harper was a health and fitness fanatic, but also had a family history of heart disease. Are genetics alone enough to cause a heart attack, even if you’re healthy?
A: Yes, it’s possible that genetics can be the major factor leading to a heart attack. It’s uncommon, but we do see either severe heart disease or heart attacks that occur in very active people or even competitive athletes like marathon runners.

Genetics are complex, but basically involve deficiencies or mutations of certain genes that cause the coronary arteries to be more susceptible to the fatty plaque build-up that obstructs blood flow or can cause a sudden heart attack. Genetics can also refer to cardiac risk factors such as high cholesterol or diabetes that can be very difficult to control despite medical therapy.

So, it’s important to get established with a doctor who can monitor your blood pressure, cholesterol and weight over time.

Learn more about cardiovascular services at Lexington Medical Center by visiting LexMed.com/Heart.