Tag Archives: back pain

Lexington Brain and Spine Institute Welcomes Robert L. Deters, MD

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to welcome Robert L. Deters, MD, to its network of care. Dr. Deters will practice at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice that specializes in disorders of the spine and surrounding nerves.

Dr. Robert Deters

A magna cum laude graduate of the University of Cincinnati in Cincinnati, Ohio, Dr. Deters earned his medical degree from Wright State University Medical School in Dayton, Ohio. While there, Dr. Deters became an esteemed member of Alpha Omega Alpha. He then completed residencies at the University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Center and St. Francis Medical Center in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Dr. Deters is a member of the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation and the American Society of Addiction Medicine. He is board certified by the American Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation with additional subspecialty certification in pain management.

Dr. Deters has more than 20 years of experience providing interventional pain management services and electrodiagnostic studies. He most recently cared for patients and served as an assistant professor in the Department of Orthopaedics at the University of Massachusetts Medical Center in Worcester, Massachusetts. He also served on the Massachusetts Medical Society Opioid Task Force, which makes recommendations and helps create policies to combat the national opioid crisis.

Dr. Deters offers a wide array of interventional pain management procedures such as trigger point injections, nerve block injections and radiofrequency nerve ablations. He joins the board-certified physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute to meet the needs of patients who suffer from painful conditions that range from knee, hip and joint pain to spine disorders and cancer pain.

He is accepting new patients. Visit LexingtonBrainandSpine.com.

Keeping Your Back on Track at Work

Lifting heavy objects.
Overusing the same muscle.
Carrying children and groceries.
Sitting at a desk with poor posture.

These are some of the things that put our backs to the test every day. Janie C. “Kaki” Bruce, MD, and and Bruce Goeckeritz, MD, FACR, CCD, are rheumatologists with Lexington Rheumatology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. As doctors treating joint and soft tissue diseases, they have great advice for keeping your back on track in the workplace.

“Sitting at a desk all day can cause neck, shoulder and upper back pain,” Dr. Goeckeritz said. “There can be chronic strain on your muscles from poor posture while spending hours in front of a computer screen using a keyboard and mouse. It’s the same kind of pain that comes form overworking muscles during a weekend project around the house.”

Some patients also experience a headache in the back of the head that gets worse as the day progresses, or pain that spreads and feels like pins and needles.

“For most of us, sitting for prolonged periods is part of our daily routine,” said Dr. Bruce. In fact, studies show that American workers spend nearly six hours of each work day sitting at a desk. “Poor posture or sitting in chairs that are not ergonomically correct can also exacerbate lower back pain.”

Options including ergonomically correct chairs and standing desks can help. A rheumatologist can also proscribe injections, physical therapy, dry needling and muscle relaxers.

Lexington Rheumatology. Clockwise from top left: Bruce Goeckeritz, MD, FACR, CCD; Fernando X. Castro, MD; Janie C. “Kaki” Bruce, MD; Maria Farooq, MD; Frederick A. Talip, MD

“These treatments can help, but strengthening the muscles and preventing future strains are the keys to solving the problem permanently,” Dr. Goeckeritz said.

Back pain that continues for more than three months can be related to osteoarthritis in the back – also known as degenerative disc disease.

“This condition results form wear and tear between the disc spaces in the spine, causing narrowing and bone spur formation,” Dr. Bruce said. “Pain usually begins in patients over age 40 with a history of overuse or injury.”

Other types of arthritis can cause inflammation in the spine and other joints. These conditions usually include stiffness in the morning that improves during the day and with use.

Sometimes, back pain may indicate a more serious condition. Back pain that radiates into the legs, or occurs with a fever, weakness in the leg, or onset of incontinence warrants a trip to the doctor immediately.

Rheumatologists can help establish the cause of back pain, rule out concerning symptoms that need immediate attention, and recommend appropriate therapy.

Back Tips
~Sit upright, pull the computer keyboard toward you and raise the monitor so that you don’t slump your shoulders or lean your head and neck forward while looking at the screen.
~The top of your computer monitor should be at eye level.
~Your chair should have adjustable seat height, back and arm rests.
~Stretch your shoulders, neck and upper back frequently.
~Avoid sitting or holding a muscle group in the same position for hours.
~Outside of work, participate in exercise that focuses on strengthening the muscles of the neck and upper back.

Treating Back Pain at Lexington Brain and Spine Institute

Surgery isn’t always necessary when it comes to back pain. At Lexington Brain and Spine Institute, doctors first work to get you better through treatments at home.

If surgery is needed, today’s back surgery is safer, requires less time in the hospital, and features faster recovery time. In this WLTX interview, Dr. Philip Toussaint, Lexington Medical Center neurosurgeon, explains how his practice fixes all types of back problems – caused by everything from trauma to lifting something that’s too heavy.