Women’s Night Out 2012

More than 900 people attended Lexington Medical Center’s annual Women’s Night Out last night to celebrate breast cancer survivors.  This year’s edition was most highly attended ever. Women’s Night Out benefits the Crystal Smith Fund at the Lexington Medical Center Foundation.  Named in honor of an LMC employee who died of breast cancer at the young age of 42, the fund helps cancer patients purchase needed resources and supplies. 

This year’s speaker was breast cancer survivor Dee Dee Ricks, an activist for patient navigation and caring for women who do not have the financial resources to pay for treatment.  She was the subject of an HBO Documentary called The Education of Dee Dee Ricks.

Here are some photos.

Thank you to our sponsor WACH and emcee Tyler Ryan. Here’s a clip from the WACH FOX Good Day morning newscast the day after Women’s Night Out.

Pink Glove Dance Voting Begins Today!

 

Today is an important day!  Voting in the 2012 Pink Glove Dance competition begins today at 1:00 p.m. Eastern time..  The hospital is asking everyone in our community to vote for our Pink Glove Dance by going to www.pinkglovedance.com and “Liking” our dance with a Facebook account.  A vote for our video is a show of support for cancer survivors everywhere.

For the second year in a row, Lexington Medical Center is entering the international Pink Glove Dance video contest sponsored by Medline Industries, Inc.  The project honors cancer survivors and raises awareness about breast cancer.

Our hospital’s 2012 Pink Glove Dance features the compelling story of Lexington Medical Center nurse Amy Kinard of Lexington, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the young age of 34.  The video is shot in our hospital and around our community – including at a highly-energized Williams-Brice Stadium, on a special pink glove skydiving adventure and inside a rock star celebration of cancer survivors.

“It’s bigger, better, bolder and over-the-top,” said Mark Shelley, director of Marketing at Lexington Medical Center and supervisor of the hospital’s Pink Glove Dance, speaking about the hospital’s 2012 dance.

In total, approximately 1,000 Lexington Medical Center employees dancing to the Katy Perry song “Part of Me” in the video.  In addition to high energy and Broadway style choreography, there are special effects, smoke, strobe lights and more.  Importantly, the dance features several LMC employees who are breast cancer survivors; they’re wearing t-shirts that say “Survivor from Day 1,” noting the strength and courage of breast cancer patients right from the time of their diagnosis.  “Survivor From Day 1” is the theme of this year’s video.

 In 2011, with more than 60,000 votes and 110,000 You Tube views, Lexington Medical Center clinched the first-ever Pink Glove Dance contest.  The hospital beat more than 130 other health care organizations from around the United States and Canada with a dance featuring hundreds of Lexington Medical Center employees dancing with pink gloves. 

 The dance became so popular, it was featured on national television including ABC World News Tonight and Fox & Friends on the FOX News Network.

“It’s more than a video or a contest.  It’s a show of support for everyone in our community who is fighting cancer,” said Shelley. 

You can vote for Lexington Medical Center’s Pink Glove Dance by going to www.pinkglovedance.com and clicking “Like” with your Facebook account.  You must have a Facebook account to vote.  Please encourage your family and friends to vote for Lexington Medical Center’s video, too.

“If the Gamecocks can win back-to-back national baseball championships, maybe we can win back-to-back Pink Glove Dance championships,” said Mike Biediger, President & CEO of Lexington Medical Center.

 Lexington Medical Center is the only Columbia area hospital entering the competition.  Voting for the Pink Glove Dance 2012 is from October 12th to October 26th

Pink Glove Video Dance

By: Crissie Miller Kirby

Over the last year I have been so blessed in having been chosen as one of the Every Woman bloggers.  I have had a chance to pursue my lifelong dream of writing and have had the chance to meet some wonderful people and gain much self confidence through this endeavor.  However, few things can match being asked to participate in the Lexington Medical Center’s video for the 2nd annual Pink Glove Dance competition.

As soon as the email came in inviting the bloggers, I knew I wanted to be in attendance.  For those of you who may not know, the Pink Glove Dance is a competition is sponsored by the medical supply company, Medline; the winner of which will choose a breast cancer research foundation to receive a $10,000 donation.  And if you missed the big news from last year, our own Lexington Medical Center was the inaugural competition’s winner, securing the $10,000 for the Vera Bradley Foundation.

Breast cancer is a devastating and debilitating disease.  It knows no boundaries; striking young and old; black and white; even male and female.  My mother-in-law was diagnosed with it shortly before my oldest son was born in 2005; almost seven years later she is cancer free.  One of my dearest friends was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2010 at the relatively young age of 40; almost three years later, she, too, is cancer free.  In 2011, this same friend asked me to join her in participating in a Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer walk in Florida.  What an honor and awesome experience it was for me to walk beside her and watch her cross the finish line after all she had been through.  Being able to participate in the Pink Glove Dance was another way for me to honor these two ladies in my life and all those who have battled breast cancer.

Fast forward to the day of the taping of the finale sequence of the dance; when I arrived at the hospital locale for the shoot, I stood back in awe of the number of people in attendance.  Young, old, male, female; just as breast cancer knows no boundaries, those wanting to stand up in the fight against it knew no boundaries either.  There were doctors and nurses; hospital staff; and even a hospital chaplain who clearly had to have been in the roughly 70-year-age range (he impressed me the most as he stayed and danced the entire 4 hours in a clergy collar, no less).

As rehearsals began, I was reminded of just how terribly uncoordinated I was; in the end, it made no difference because we were all learning the moves together, for a common cause.  As daylight turned into dusk and then darkness, the site was illuminated with energy (and some really big flood lights).  We pressed on, encouraged continually by the choreographer and director.  The atmosphere was absolutely phenomenal and unmatched by just about anything I have witnessed in my 34 years.

During one of the breaks, I remember telling Jennifer Wilson how neat it was to see the breast cancer survivors themselves, many of whom had been highlighted by name in last year’s video.  They truly were the stars of the night; and rightfully so.  Their untiring and unwavering spirit was evidence of what they truly must have gone through during their battles with this dreaded disease.  I think it helped to motivate all of us; I know it did me.

As the filming drew to a close, I looked around at all of the people present for this undertaking and reflected on what a wonderful and moving experience it had been for me, personally.  To be surrounded by so many people all fighting for a common cause without regard to race, gender, religion; it was truly an inspiring event.

Once upon a time, breast cancer was hard to detect and treat.  Today, depending on stage of detection, some breast cancer survival rates near 100%.  Obviously, early detection and treatment are key in continuing to increase the survival rates. However, new and more effective treatments are continually needed and this is what the Pink Glove Dance represents – a chance to utilize funding to assist in research, development, and testing so that maybe one day, breast cancer will be nothing more than a memory of days gone by.

In closing, obviously, we would LOVE to see a repeat win for Lexington Medical Center in the Pink Glove Dance Competition! This year’s video is set to the encouraging song “Part of Me” by Katy Perry, and chronicles the breast cancer battle of one of Lexington Medical Center’s own nurses.  Voting will begin on Friday, October 12th.  Be on the lookout on Facebook for the video’s debut.  Make sure to “Like” it, share it and help Lexington Medical Center secure another $10,000 donation to the Vera Bradley Foundation!

Good Luck LMC!  Job well done!