A Sweet Melody

The melodious tune of “Somewhere Over the Rainbow” fills the community room inside Lexington Medical Center Extended Care as pianist Linda Skipper, who volunteers regularly at Extended Care, brings a beautiful baby grand piano to life with her tremendous talent.

And the residents love it.

“You’ll see feet tap that don’t normally tap, a lot of smiles and sometimes tears,” she said.

Pianist_ExtCareThe baby grand piano at Extended Care was a gift from the Lexington Medical Center Foundation in 2011. The instrument fills the room with incredible sound as volunteers play it nearly every day. Everyone here is grateful for the Lexington Medical Center Foundation is able to provide here thanks to generous donors in our community.

Lexington Medical Center Extended Care is the hospital’s 352-bed skilled nursing facility, the largest in the Carolinas. It also includes the 36-bed Carroll Campbell Place for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, which was named in honor of the late South Carolina governor, Carroll Campbell, who lived there.

Over the years, the Lexington Medical Center Foundation has made more than $1.2 million in contributions to the facility, including new televisions, renovations to walkways, gathering spaces and resident units, and landscaping.

“When we admit a resident, we admit the whole family,” said Wayne Stowe, vice president of Extended Care. “Creating a beautiful facility with well-appointed features helps patients and family members feel more comfortable and have better visits together.”

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation provides important programs and services that help people in our community, including cancer patients. Please consider giving to the Lexington Medical Center Foundation during the Central Carolina Community Foundation’s “Midlands Gives” challenge on May 5. Learn more at MidlandsGives.org.

Heart & Sole Pictures!

There was a record crowd at the Lexington Medical Center Heart & Sole Women’s Five Miler on Saturday, April 25. More than 1,300 women participated, including more than 400 Lexington Medical Center employees. Here are some employees on Team LMC along the course!

Exercise for Cancer Patients

“You can lift that much weight?”

That’s the question Debra Carter got at Health Directions, Lexington Medical Center’s fitness and wellness gym, recently.

Her 30-pound presses on a strength training machine would be impressive to anyone. But what was even more impressive – and that no one knew – was that Carter was a cancer patient, still undergoing treatment, too.

The Cayce woman, age 52, was diagnosed with breast cancer in the fall of 2011. She underwent a lumpectomy and dozens of radiation treatments. During the end of radiation, she started going to Health Directions for Cancer Exercise Training, a program run with the help of the Lexington Medical Center Foundation.

Cancer Survivors 0144That’s where she met Thad Werts, who, with a Cancer Exercise Trainer (CET) certification from the American College of Sports Medicine, is an expert in helping people with cancer exercise correctly. A CET understands cancer patients’ diagnosis, surgeries, treatments, symptoms and side effects.

“With cancer, you can be active,” he said. “I look at what we can do to make everyone’s cancer experience better.”

In March, Werts put Carter on an 8-session, twice-per-week program to increase her strength and endurance, including a mix of cardio and weights.

With his training, he understands how cancer impacts exercise, and what it’s important for patients to do – and not to do. For example, chemotherapy can lower cardiovascular endurance. And, that it’s important to be careful with range of motion for breast cancer patients who’ve had surgery, especially with chest exercises.

“I can help them build back up their muscle so that they have more strength,” he said.

Carter liked it.

“It makes you feel so much better because you have more energy,” she said.

Since beginning the program two years ago, Werts has built up the program to train about ten patients each month, including breast, prostate and colon cancer patients.

The importance of such exercise is well-documented among cancer clinicians, who stress the importance of incorporating wellness activity into regimens for people who are moving into the survivor phase of life.

This exercise has emotional benefits, too.

“There’s a depression factor that I didn’t understand until I went through the training,” Werts said. “Women who have gone through hormone therapy have a tendency to gain more weight, so they feel more self-conscious.”

He says exercise can help them feel happier.

“I love the clinical aspect,” he said. “I knew I never wanted to be a doctor, but that I wanted to help as many people as possible.”

It’s made a difference for Carter. Werts has inspired her to exercise for the long-term.

“He has given me a second chance,” she said.

The Lexington Medical Center Foundation provides important programs and services that help people in our community, including cancer patients. Please consider giving to the Lexington Medical Center Foundation during the Central Carolina Community Foundation’s “Midlands Gives” challenge on May 5. Learn more at MidlandsGives.org.