Fixing Abnormal Heart Rhythms

Did you know your heart has an electrical system? It does! And it helps your heart keep a healthy beat. When something goes wrong with a heart’s rhythm, an electrophysiologist can help. In this WLTX interview, Dr. Christopher Rowley of Lexington Cardiology at Lexington Medical Center talks about fixing abnormal heartbeats.

 

Christopher P. Rowley, MD, graduated magna cum laude from Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania with a Bachelor of Science in biochemistry and earned his medical degree from Wake Forest University School of Medicine in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. He then completed his internal medicine internship and residency at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, North Carolina, while completing Duke’s Clinical Research Training Program. He went on to complete cardiovascular disease and electrophysiology fellowships at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

Dr. Christopher Rowley

Board certified in internal medicine, cardiovascular disease and electrophysiology by the American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Rowley is also a member of the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association and the Heart Rhythm Society. Prior to joining Lexington Medical Center’s network of care, he provided cardiac electrophysiology services at Brookwood Medical Center and Grandview Medical Center in Birmingham, Alabama, and at Shelby Medical Center in Alabaster, Alabama.

He’s accepting new patents. Visit LexCardio.com.

#JustSayKnow

Lexington Medical Center Doctor Treats 9/11 Victims

Dr. Adam Lazzarini is an orthopaedic surgeon with Southeastern Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. On September 11, 2001, he was a medical resident at St. Vincent’s Hospital in New York. In the days and months after the terrorist attacks, he treated dozens of injured first responders and workers from the World Trade Center site. He shared the story of his experience in New York during that time in this WIS-TV report, which aired earlier this month before the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers South Carolina 5K.

 

To learn more about the Stephen Siller Tunnel to Towers South Carolina 5K, visit www.t2tscrun.org.

Living with Metastatic Breast Cancer

Marie Pitts has Stage 4 breast cancer. She was diagnosed with breast cancer after finding a lump during a self exam. She has received treatment at Lexington Medical Cancer Center and Duke – Lexington Medical Center’s cancer program is affiliated with Duke Health.

Marie uses her faith and experience to help inspire and help other patients in their cancer journey. She will be a model in the fashion show at Women’s Night Out, Lexington Medical Center’s dinner honoring breast cancer survivors and their families, scheduled for Tuesday, October 17 in Columbia. We’re pleased to introduce her to you in this WLTX report.

 

For tickets to Women’s Night Out, visit LMCFoundation.com. We hope to see you there!