Lexington Medical Center Earns Stroke Award

For the sixth consecutive year, Lexington Medical Center has received a “Gold Plus” Quality Achievement Award for stroke care from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get With The Guidelines® – Stroke program. The “Gold Plus” award is the highest honor bestowed to hospitals for stroke care and recognizes commitment and success in implementing excellent care for stroke patients.

“Lexington Medical Center is proud to receive this award as it demonstrates our commitment to being one of the top hospitals in the country for providing effective, evidence-based stroke care,” said Vicky Hicks, RN, BSN, CPHQ, outcomes coordinator at Lexington Medical Center.

2016 Gold Plus AHA ASA Award iconThe honor goes to hospitals with excellent adherence to stroke quality indicators and measures, including aggressive use of proven medications, therapy, cholesterol reducing drugs and smoking cessation, all aimed at reducing death and disability, and improving the lives of stroke patients.

According to the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association, stroke is one of the leading causes of death and serious, long-term disability in the United States. On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; someone dies of a stroke every four minutes; and 795,000 people suffer a new or recurrent stroke each year.

A stroke occurs when a clot blocks a blood vessel carrying oxygen and nutrients to the brain or bursts. When that happens, part of the brain cannot get the blood and oxygen it needs and begins to die. Warning signs include weakness on one side of the body, slurred speech, facial drooping, confusion and the inability to talk. Risk factors for stroke are untreated high blood pressure, diabetes, smoking and high cholesterol. Stroke is an emergency. Call 911 at the first sign of stroke. Modifying your lifestyle can help prevent stroke.

Lexington Medical Center also has certification from Det Norske Veritas Healthcare, Inc. as a Primary Stroke Center in the Midlands. The Certification Program for Primary Stroke Centers recognizes organizations that follow the best practices for stroke care. Achieving Primary Stroke Center Certification indicates the hospital’s dedication to cultivating better outcomes for patients.

May is Stroke Awareness Month. Think F.A.S.T. to remember the warning signs of stroke.

Face – Look for an uneven smile.
Arm – Check if one arm is weak.
Speech – Has speech become difficult?
Time – Call 9-1-1 immediately.

For more information, visit LexMed.com/Stroke

What Can I Eat? Bringing Back An Old Favorite

By Laura Stepp, MA, RD, LD, Clinical Dietitian at Lexington Medical Center

Again, I find myself looking at another beautiful picture of food and thinking about all of those vegetables I bought at the farmer’s market over the weekend. There are so many ways to incorporate and combine vegetables. The possibilities are endless, and yes, overwhelming. So as I looked through the most recent edition of Diabetic Living® Magazine, I saw an up-to-date and refreshing recipe for an old favorite: Waldorf Salad Lettuce Wraps.

Waldorf Salad Wraps

Waldorf Salad Wraps

Now many of you (especially if you are a child of the 70’s or before) might be thinking, “Yikes! The mayonnaise based salad with nuts and fruits that our parents used to eat?” Yes. My cardiac and diabetes clients are always interested in eating better but are conflicted with wanting to enjoy old traditional recipes. At the same time, I’m encouraging them to try new vegetables in new ways. Let’s do both with this heart-healthy and diabetes-friendly version.

Servings: 4 (2 wraps each)
Carbs per serving: 33 g
Start to finish preparation; 25 mins (not including cook time for whole grain)

1-1/4 cups of a cooked whole grain (brown or wild rice, pearled barley)
1 cup thin sliced apple
1 cup chopped celery
¾ cup chopped cauliflower florets
½ cup red/black seedless grapes, halved or quartered
½ cup chopped walnuts (toasted)
½ cup plain low-fat Greek yogurt (yes, really)
1 Tbsp honey (local – preferably)
½ tsp kosher salt (can substitute sea salt)
½ tsp celery seeds
¼ tsp black pepper
8 Bibb lettuce leaves (can substitute green or red leaf lettuce leaves)

1. In a large bowl combine the first six ingredients (Whole grain through walnuts). For dressing, in a small bowl combine the next six ingredients (yogurt through pepper)
2. Pour dressing over whole grain mixture; toss gently to coast. Spoon onto lettuce leaves; roll up.

Per Serving: 204 calories; (1 g Sat fat), 33g carbs (5 g fiber, 14 g sugars), 8 g protein

Here We Grow! Lexington Medical Center Breaks Ground on Clinical Expansion

Lexington Medical Center held a groundbreaking ceremony on Monday, May 9, 2016 at 4:00 p.m. on the hospital campus in West Columbia to celebrate a significant clinical expansion that’s about to begin. Lexington Medical Center is building a 545,000-sq-ft patient care tower that will make Lexington Medical Center the most modern, state-of-the-art hospital in South Carolina.
LMC_groundbreaking_01
The 10-story tower will initially add 71 inpatient beds to the 414-bed hospital with the ability to accommodate more patients in the future. It will feature patient rooms, operating rooms, educational space for staff and community members, and enhanced dining options, as well as expand the hospital’s Labor and Delivery and Mother/Baby departments.

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“Our medical staff, employees and volunteers understand and embrace the belief that Lexington Medical Center is here to serve our friends and neighbors. The hospital is woven into the fabric of Lexington County and the Midlands,” said Tod Augsburger, president & CEO of Lexington Medical Center. “This clinical expansion will allow us to take care of our community for many years to come.”

Lexington Medical Center is one of the busiest surgical hospitals in South Carolina, performing more than 19,000 surgeries last year. The clinical expansion will include eight additional operating rooms for a total of 31 operating rooms, and an expanded surgical recovery area. Six floors of the new tower will accommodate medical, critical care and surgical patients.

Welcoming more than 3,700 babies each year, the clinical expansion will become home to the hospital’s Labor and Delivery and Mother/Baby departments. In the Special Care Nursery, the hospital’s tiniest patients will have private rooms, which is an innovative concept in the Midlands. Research has shown that private rooms provide more bonding opportunities for mothers and their babies, lead to better outcomes for babies’ growth and lower infection rates.

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Because of the growth of the hospital and its network of care, the expansion will also include Lexington Medical Center’s Pharmacy department, which provides services for the hospital’s inpatient departments, six community medical and urgent care centers, and nearly 60 physician practices in 70 locations.

A new parking garage will add more than 950 parking spaces to the hospital’s campus and a central energy plant will support the service needs of the new tower.
The expansion is expected to be complete in 2019.