Cardiac Rehab Supervisor Earns Fellowship

Mark Stout, program supervisor for Cardiac Rehabilitation at Lexington Medical Center Irmo, has been selected as a Fellow of the American Association of Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Rehabilitation (AACVPR). The organization recognizes excellence, professional achievement and outstanding service in cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation.

To become a Fellow, applicants must meet criteria including submitting a resume with a record of distinguished service in the field of cardiac rehabilitation, peer recommendations and evidence of a high degree of professional development and commitment. A committee considers each application when selecting Fellowship candidates.

“I am honored to be recognized by AACVPR as a Fellow,” Stout said. “It has been rewarding to be able to impact the lives of those with heart disease and their families, and encourage them to make meaningful lifestyle changes that ultimately lead to a better quality of life.”

Mark Stout inside Cardiac Rehabilitation at Lexington Medical Center Irmo

Mark Stout inside Cardiac Rehabilitation at Lexington Medical Center Irmo


As supervisor at Lexington Medical Center’s cardiac rehabilitation program in Irmo, Mr. Stout’s primary goal is to help patients recover from cardiac incidents and teach them necessary lifestyle skills to prevent future incidents. That includes exercise, healthy nutrition, smoking cessation, stress management and relaxation training. Mr. Stout provides tools and support to ensure that the hospital’s patients have the best possible experience and that the program meets and exceeds national standards.

Statistics show that heart patients who participate in cardiac rehabilitation reduce their risk of mortality by up to 46 percent compared with non-participants. They also reduce their risk of suffering another cardiac incident.

Mr. Stout has worked in cardiac rehabilitation at Lexington Medical Center since 1993. With a master’s degree in exercise physiology, he has also served as vice-chair of AACVPR and will become chair in September.

In a letter to Mr. Stout announcing his acceptance as a Fellow, AACVPR stated, “Your service to AACVPR, to your profession and to your affiliate organization, as outlined on your application, sets you apart as a leader and outstanding professional in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation.”

Lexington Medical Center has operated a cardiac rehabilitation program for more than two decades at the hospital in West Columbia and at Lexington Medical Center’s community medical center in Lexington since 2002. This past spring, the hospital began offering cardiac rehabilitation in Irmo.

Cardiac rehabilitation is one component of Lexington Medical Center’s comprehensive cardiovascular care program. Affiliated with Duke Medicine, the hospital offers a full range of cardiac care including open heart surgery and therapeutic catheterizations. Lexington Medical Centre is the most experienced facility in the Midlands for transcatheter aortic valve replacement, known as TAVR. This state-of-the-art cardiac technology allows doctors to replace the aortic valve with a catheter instead of open heart surgery. Moreover, the hospital operates an electrophysiology program that treats abnormal heart rhythms and performs procedures that close holes in the heart.

Lexington Medical Center has received full chest pain accreditation with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care (SCPC). To receive this accreditation, Lexington Medical Center demonstrated its ability to quickly assess, diagnose and treat patients who may be experiencing a heart attack. By becoming an accredited chest pain center, Lexington Medical Center has enhanced the quality of care for cardiac patients and has showed its commitment to the highest standards.

For more information, visit LexMed.com

Detecting Breast Cancer Earlier and Easier

Imagine trying to find a specific snowball in the middle of a snowstorm, or a needle in a haystack. Not easy, right? For women with dense breast tissue, finding breast cancer in its early stages can be equally challenging. Thankfully, a new tool at Lexington Medical Center is making that job easier.

mammogramXAs part of a comprehensive program for the diagnosis of breast cancer, Lexington Medical Center now offers 3-D mammography. This new breast cancer screening tool uses a low-dose X-ray to create images of the breast that allow doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time. The technology creates multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan.

“Lexington Medical Center is excited to offer this leading-edge technology for breast cancer screening,” said Dr. Beth Siroty-Smith, director of Women’s Imaging services for Lexington Radiology Associates at Lexington Medical Center. “3-D mammography reduces difficulties in identifying abnormalities in women with denser breast tissue and results in increased cancer detection.”

3-D mammography, also known as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), is currently recommended for women who are having their first screening mammogram or who have dense breast tissue.

The term “dense breasts” refers to the appearance of breast tissue on a mammogram. Dense breast tissue appears as a solid white area, which makes it difficult to see through. Non-dense breast tissue appears dark and transparent.

2D_3D MammographyDense breast tissue can make it more difficult to interpret a mammogram, since cancer and dense breast tissue both appear white on a mammogram. Very dense breasts may increase the risk that cancer won’t be detected on a mammogram.

Studies in The Journal of The American Medical Association have shown that 3-D mammography increases breast cancer detection, and reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

Available since this past spring, Lexington Medical Center was the first facility in the Midlands to offer this technology. Women who have completed a 3-D mammography screening at Lexington Medical Center also report that the procedure is less painful and more tolerable than the traditional 2-D mammogram.

The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2-D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Women who have questions about whether or not they should receive a 3-D mammogram should talk to their doctor.

You may be more likely to have dense breasts if you’re younger. Breast tissue tends to become less dense as you age, although some women have dense breast tissue at any age. Premenopausal women and women who take hormone therapy for menopause are also more likely to have dense breast tissue.

Women who are having a first screening mammogram or whose doctors have told them they have dense breast tissue may schedule a 3-D mammogram at Lexington Medical Center’s Women’s Imaging facility on the main hospital campus in West Columbia. Women’s Imaging will nearly double the number of daily scheduling slots in an effort to accommodate all interested women. Evening and weekend hours will also soon be available. To schedule an appointment, please call (803) 791-2486.

In addition to being an American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Center of Excellence, Lexington Medical Center’s breast program has accreditation from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers and the cancer program has accreditation with commendation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.

For more information, visit LexMed.com.

Under Pressure: How Blood Pressure Affects Your Health

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to present its July physician lecture, “Under Pressure: How Blood Pressure Affects Your Health,” on Monday, July 27, 2015 at 6:00 p.m. inside the Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium on the hospital campus. Dr. Payton Foust of Lexington Family Practice Otarre Pointe, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, will give the lecture. The event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be served. It’s part of the hospital’s monthly physician lecture series on health topics that are important to our community.

Dr. Payton Foust

Dr. Payton Foust

Blood pressure is a significant health problem. In the United States, one out of every 3 adults has high blood pressure. Sometimes, people are unaware that they have it. High blood pressure can increase your risk for heart attack and stroke. Over time, uncontrolled high blood pressure can be fatal.
“Though medical treatment for hypertension is important and will ultimately be overseen by a health care professional, patients have a tremendous ability to lower their blood pressure through lifestyle modification,” Dr. Foust said. “Patients should work to maintain a healthy blood pressure and healthy lifestyle.”

A magna cum laude graduate of the University of South Carolina Honors College in Columbia, Dr. Foust earned his medical degree from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. He then completed his family medicine residency at Self Regional Healthcare in Greenwood, S.C.

bloodpressure_13Dr. Foust is board certified by the American Board of Family Medicine and has additional certifications in advanced life support for general, cardiac, obstetric and pediatric patients. He is also certified in critical care support. He is a member of the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American Medical Association.

The Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium is at 2728 Sunset Boulevard in West Columbia on the hospital campus.

Lexington Medical Center offers a monthly physician lecture series on a variety of pertinent health topics. For more information on upcoming lectures, visit LexMed.com.