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Lexington Medical Center Begins 3D Mammography

As part of a comprehensive program for the diagnosis of breast cancer, Lexington Medical Center is pleased to announce it now offers 3D mammography. This new breast cancer screening tool creates a group of three dimensional images of the breast and allows doctors to view tissue one millimeter at a time, making tiny details visible earlier and easier. 3D mammography, also known as digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), is currently recommended for women who are having their first screening mammogram or who have dense breast tissue.

mammogramXLexington Medical Center is the first facility in the Midlands to offer this technology. Studies in the Journal of The American Medical Association have shown that 3D mammography increases breast cancer detection, and reduces false positives and unnecessary callbacks for patients with dense breast tissue.

“Lexington Medical Center is excited to offer this leading edge technology for breast cancer screening,” said Dr. Beth Siroty-Smith, director of Women’s Imaging services for Lexington Radiology Associates at Lexington Medical Center. “3D mammography reduces difficulties in identifying abnormalities in women with denser breast tissue and results in increased cancer detection.”

In the images below, you see a 2D mammogram on the left and a 3D image (Tomosynthesis) on the right. The suspicious area in the 2D image is more blurry and easier to miss. In the 3D (Tomosynthesis) images on the right, it’s more clearly defined and an obvious abnormality.



3D mammography uses a low dose X-ray to create multiple images within seconds that are similar to the “slices” of images in a CT scan. The FDA-approved procedure uses the same type of equipment as a 2D mammogram and a similar dose of radiation. Women who have questions about whether or not they should receive a 3D mammogram should talk to their doctor.

breast cancer ribbonWomen who are having a first screening mammogram or whose doctors have told them they have dense breast tissue may schedule a 3D mammogram at Lexington Medical Center’s Women’s Imaging facility on the main hospital campus in West Columbia. Women’s Imaging will nearly double the number of daily scheduling slots in an effort to accommodate all interested women. Evening and weekend hours will also soon be available. To schedule an appointment, please call (803) 791-2486.

In addition to being an American College of Radiology Breast Imaging Center of Excellence, Lexington Medical Center’s breast program has accreditation from the National Accreditation Program for Breast Centers and the cancer program has accreditation with commendation by the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer.

What To Expect When You’re Not Expecting It

Dr. Nichole McDonald, OB/GYN at Lexington Women’s Care, was a guest on WLTX recently to talk about “What To Expect When You’re Not Expecting It.” The discussion centered around everything you wish you knew, but no one ever told you. Check it out in the link below.

Here are a few notes from Dr. McDonald’s interview:

~Puberty begins in African American girls around age 8 or 9, and in Caucasian girls around age 10. It’s important that parents help walk them through their daughters through those changes.

~A woman should see her gynecologist once each year, beginning when she becomes sexually active or between the ages of 18 and 21.

~We begin screening for cervical cancer at age 21. As long as pap smears are normal, we now screen every 3 to 5 years.

~During pregnancy, nausea and vomiting are typical early in pregnancy. But if it causes more than 10 pounds of weight loss, call your doctor. And, if you feel regular tightening of your abdomen before 34 weeks gestation, you should call your doctor.

~Before menopause begins, women will begin noticing changes in their menstrual cycle – the cycle will become more erratic and irregular. Menopause occurs when a woman goes one year without a menstrual cycle.

~Bone density is a measure of the amount of mineralization of a bone per cubic centimeter. When a woman starts to have thinning of the bones, we start worrying about osteoporosis. We begin screening for that around age 65. Women should get a good amount of calcium throughout their life to prevent osteoporosis. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.

What To Expect When You’re Not Expecting It

Women go through a lot of changes during their lifetime. Some of them are unexpected and can be scary. In our hospital’s FREE physician lecture this month, Dr. Nichole McDonald will cover everything you wish you knew – but no one told you. Call you mothers, daughters and girlfriends. From puberty to menopause, Dr. McDonald will share a wealth of knowledge for women in all stages of life.