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Calling All Women Bloggers!

Lexington Medical Center is sponsoring a contest from May 1st to May 31st to find additional, talented bloggers for its Every Woman Blog. Through the contest, the hospital plans to select five women from the community to be featured as permanent bloggers. Their posts will appear each month on the EveryWomanBlog.com website. The contest is open to women of all ages, and each selected blogger will receive a $250 cash prize.

The Every Woman Blog has been active for more than seven years, with more than 327,000 post views. The blog has received several awards from leading health care organizations such as the Carolinas Healthcare Public Relations and Marketing Society and the Aster Awards. Winners of the blog contest will join Shannon Boatwright, Mary Pat Baldauf, Katie Austin, Chaunte McClure, Ashley Whisonant, Jeanne Reynolds, Rachel Sircy and Stacy Thompson as featured bloggers at EveryWomanBlog.com.

“We’re looking forward to growing our exceptional team of Every Woman Bloggers,” said Lexington Medical Center Public Relations Manager Jennifer Wilson. “We know people like to read real, inspiring stories from others in their community, and we are grateful to our bloggers for their willingness to share their thoughts and experiences with our blog audience. We are lucky to have so many diverse perspectives in the community represented in this blog and we look forward to adding new voices to the mix.”

To enter the blogging contest, visit Lexington Medical Center’s Facebook page at http://www.facebook.com/LexingtonMedical. Send a message or video about why you would be a great blogger to represent and inspire women in the Midlands. Five women with the most persuasive, funny, touching or engaging posts will be selected to become featured bloggers on the Every Woman Blog.

Each featured blogger will write at least one post per month. The topics will vary greatly depending on the personalities of the bloggers and their daily experiences in the community. Visitors can expect some of the posts to be videos. The bloggers will also meet in person at “blogger reunions” to share ideas and brainstorm topics.

The Every Woman Blog also features occasional guest bloggers from Lexington Medical Center’s medical staff. With Lexington Medical Center as the sponsor of the blog, readers can expect to find an abundance of helpful health information. For more information, visit www.EveryWomanBlog.com.

Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic Welcomes Katie Willett Dahlberg, MD

Katie Willett Dahlberg, MD

Lexington Medical Center proudly welcomes Katie Willett Dahlberg, MD, to Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

Dr. Dahlberg joins the board-certified physicians and highly skilled staff at Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic. The practice provides comprehensive care in the evaluation, monitoring, prevention and treatment of cognitive and general neurological disorders, including nervous system inflammatory diseases, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis, early and late onset dementia, Parkinson’s disease, stroke, seizures and epilepsy, and migraines, among other conditions.

A graduate of the University of Florida in Gainesville, Dr. Dahlberg earned her medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine in Columbia. She then completed her neurology residency at USC, where she also served as chief resident.

Dr. Dahlberg is a member of the American Academy of Neurology with certifications in advanced cardiac and basic life support, as well as Allergan Botox® training. Before providing comprehensive care for disorders of the nervous system in private practice, she completed work as a sub-investigator for two research studies: one related to secondary stroke prevention and the other focused on treatment of ischemic stroke with mild symptoms.

Dr. Dahlberg is accepting new patients.

146 North Hospital Drive, Suite 500
West Columbia, SC 29169
(803) 936-7076
SENeurologyandMemory.com

Spot the Signs of Stroke

Which of the following is a sign of stroke?
Facial drooping.
Arm weakness.
Slurred speech.
The answer? All of the above. And if you see someone with the symptoms of a stroke, it’s important to act quickly.

A stroke occurs when a blood vessel that carries oxygen and nutrients to the brain is either blocked by a clot or bursts. When that happens, part of the brain can’t get the oxygen it needs and starts to die. If it lasts for a long time, there can be permanent damage.

Risk factors for stroke include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, obesity, diabetes, smoking, excessive alcohol use and atrial fibrillation, a type of irregular heartbeat.

South Carolina has a high rate of stroke. In fact, it’s the fourth leading cause of death in the state. Statistics show that more than 20,000 people suffer a stroke in South Carolina each year, and more than 2,500 people die from a stroke.

“South Carolina is in what’s known as the ‘Stroke Belt’,” said Douglas Sinclair, DO, a neurologist with Southeastern Neurology and Memory Clinic, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. “Our state has a bad combination of factors including smoking, poor diet, and not seeking routine medical care that makes us have a higher prevalence of stroke than the rest of the country. Here in the South, we deep fry pickles.”

When it comes to stroke, experts say to think “F-A-S-T” to look for symptoms and respond.
F: Facial drooping
A: Arm weakness
S: Slurred speech
T: Time to call 9-1-1

A stroke is a medical emergency that requires immediate care. If someone shows stroke symptoms, call 9-1-1 and get them to a hospital right away. Also note the last time the person did not have any stroke symptoms. Doctors may treat the patient with a drug called tPA that busts clots. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability.

Douglas Sinclair, DO

“Stroke patients often do not realize they’ve had a stroke and resist the idea of going to the Emergency department,” Dr. Sinclair said. “Unlike heart attacks, the typical stroke causes no pain and patients often want to go to bed or take a nap. If you think you or a loved one is having a stroke, call 9-1-1.”

Ways to lower stroke risk include quitting smoking, talking to your doctor about treating high blood pressure or high cholesterol, and following a healthy diet such as the DASH or Mediterranean diet.

A stroke can happen at any age. While most cases of stroke are in patients older than 65, a third of all strokes in the United States occur in patients younger than that. Stroke can also run in families.

Lexington Medical Center is a certified Primary Stroke Center, which recognizes that the hospital follows the best practices for stroke care. It has also received a “Gold Plus” Quality Achievement Award for stroke care from the American Heart Association and American Stroke Association’s Get with the Guidelines Stroke program and qualified for the Target: Stroke Honor Roll.

For more information about stroke care at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.com/Stroke.