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Apply Now for Our Nurse Practitioner Fellowship

Lexington Medical Center is currently accepting applications for its Nurse Practitioner Fellowship Program. This 12-month experience is the only recognized post-graduate primary care nurse practitioner program in South Carolina.

Through practical, hands-on educational experiences and mentoring, the program’s nurse practitioner fellows receive advanced training inside Lexington Medical Center’s network of care to increase confidence and enhance clinical skills. The fellowship will include primary placement with family and internal medicine practices, along with specialty rotations from cardiology to orthopaedics. It also includes weekly learning sessions.

To qualify, nurses must successfully complete or be anticipating licensure in South Carolina as an advanced practice registered nurse. In addition, they must have at least two years of full-time nursing practice or equivalent experience in providing direct patient care within the past five years.

The goals of the program are to meet the demand for access to high quality care with well-trained nurse practitioners; increase the clinical skills, confidence and productivity of new nurse practitioners; and retain family nurse practitioners committed to developing careers within Lexington Medical Center.

The fellowship will begin in August 2017. Lexington Medical Center offers competitive compensation and benefits to nurse practitioner fellows.

Two NP fellows are currently taking part in the fellowship:

Michael Aley, MS, FNP-C

Michael Aley earned his bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of South Carolina and graduated from Clemson University with a master’s degree as a family nurse practitioner. He has worked at Lexington Medical Center for five years, caring for general surgery and cardiovascular surgery patients. Certified in medical/surgical nursing, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and advanced cardiovascular life support, he is most interested in pursuing a career in family or pediatric medicine.

Teonica Murphy, DNP, FNP-C

A magna cum laude graduate of Clemson University with a bachelor’s degree in nursing, Teonica Murphy earned a doctorate as a family nurse practitioner from the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. She has cared for patients in our Emergency department since 2013. In addition to her education and experience, Teonica is a certified emergency nurse with additional certifications in advanced cardiovascular life support, basic life support and pediatric advanced life support.

To find out ore information about the Nurse Practitioner Fellowship Program at Lexington Medical Center, visit LexMed.om/Careers/Nurses.

Sweet Dreams of Better Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep affects everything from your daytime energy to heart health. If you’re having trouble catching ZZZs, the sleep lab at Lexington Sleep Solutions can help. Check out how in this news story from WIS-TV.

 

How A Lifetime of Bad Choices Leads to Heart Disease

We’re wrapping up American Heart Month with a visit with the doctor. Dr. Brandon Drafts of Lexington Cardiology, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, talks about how a lifetime of bad choices can lead to heart disease in this WLTX interview you can watch below.

 

While are some risk factors we can’t control such our age or genetics, we CAN control diet, activity level, tobacco use, high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes.

You should get about 30 minutes of exercise a day five days a week. Focus on a consistent, long-term exercise regimen with a progression in intensity.

Smomking can increase our risk for heart disease by causing fatty plaque buildup in the heart that can ultimately lead to heart attacks.

Blood pressure is the force blood exerts on the blood vessels. Ultimately, it can weaken the blood vessels or cause the heart to thicken, weakening the function of the heart.

Generally speaking, cholesterol is a good thing because cells need cholseterol to fucntion normally. Cholesterol becomes a problem when there’s an imbalance of it, which can lead to fatty buildup in the arteries.

Stress is a modifiable risk factor that doesn’t get as much attention as it should. It’s hard to objectify or measure stress. Indirectly, it can affect blood pressure or create unhealthy habits of dealing with stress like smoking or drinking alcohol. It can also make plaque buildup in the heart unsteady, which can lead to a heart attack.

Lexington Medical Center wants you to “Just Say Know” to heart disease. Visit LexMed.com/Know to take a heart health quiz and find more information.