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Think F-A-S-T for Stroke

May is Stroke Awareness Month. South Carolina has one of the highest rates of stroke in the United States. In this WLTX interview, Dr. Katherine Dahlberg, neurologist with Southeastern Neurology & Memory Clinic at Lexington Medical Center, explains what happens inside the body when you have a stroke and how you can prevent one from happening.

When it comes so symptoms of a stroke, remember the acronym F-A-S-T. Look for Facial drooping, Arm weakness, Slurred speech, and know it’s Time to call 911. Prompt treatment is paramount in order to minimize negative stroke outcomes. Lexington Medical Center is a Primary Stroke Center, which means the hospital has demonstrated excellence in treating stroke patients promptly and successfully. Visit LexMed.com/Stroke.

Lexington Medical Center Welcomes William M. Yarbrough, MD, to Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to welcome William M. Yarbrough, MD, to Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery, a hospital physician practice.

Dr. Yarbrough proudly joins the highly skilled clinicians and staff at Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery to provide cardiovascular surgical consultations, follow-up care and vascular labs as well as a variety of cardiovascular services, including aortic/mitral valve replacement, coronary artery bypass grafting, and procedures for ascending, thoracic and abdominal aneurysms, peripheral vascular disease, lung masses and carotid arteries.

A native of Columbia, South Carolina, Dr. Yarbrough, earned his bachelor’s degree from Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, and graduated and his medical degree from the University of South Carolina School of Medicine. He then completed a general surgery internship and residency at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston, serving as administrative chief resident. He also completed a National Institute of Health postdoctoral research fellowship while at MUSC.

After completing his general surgery training, Dr. Yarbrough completed a cardiothoracic surgery residency at Stanford University in Stanford, California. He has published more than two dozen manuscripts, written and contributed to numerous book chapters and presented at peer-reviewed regional and national conferences.

Board certified by the American Board of Surgery and the American Board of Thoracic Surgery, Dr. Yarbrough most recently served as a cardiovascular and thoracic surgeon at Providence Thoracic and Cardiovascular Associates in Columbia. Prior to that role, he was an assistant professor of Cardiothoracic Surgery at MUSC.

Misconceptions about Sexually Transmitted Diseases

Statistics show that two million people will be diagnosed with a sexually transmitted disease in the United States this year. And South Carolina has the third highest number of cases of all 50 states.

In this WLTX interview, Dr. Samantha Morton, OB/GYN at Carolina Women’s Physicians, talks about some common misconceptions related to STDs – and separates fact from fiction.

According to Dr. Morton, one of the reasons there is a high number of sexually transmitted diseases may be because the use of condoms has decreased. Secondly, she says many STDs such as chlamydia can be asymptomatic for years – someone could have them and be transferring them to sexual partners without knowing. It’s also important to point out that the birth control pill will not protect patients from STDs. And, the HPV vaccine – designed to decrease the risk of cervical cancer – will not protect someone from contracting other STDs. Many times, STDs can be treated with antibiotics – but patients can still contract them again.

If you have questions about STDs, speak with your doctor.

For more information on Carolina Women’s Physicians, click here.