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The Shingles Vaccine

Shingles is a virus that causes a painful rash with blisters on the body.

Doctors recommend a shingles vaccine for people once they turn 50. But some patients report feeling sick for a day or two after receiving the shot.

In this WIS Health U report, Dr. Francisco Albert of Lexington Medical Center and a shingles patient explain why short-term discomfort from the vaccine is far better than suffering through the shingles virus.

According to Dr. Albert, 1 in 3 adults will develop shingles. He says nearly everyone who receives a shingles vaccine will have pain at the injection site. And, about half of the recipients will have flu-like symptoms for a day or two – including aches, pains, chills, nausea and headaches. Those symptoms go away after 24 to 72 hours.

While those side effects sound rough, Dr. Albert says getting the shingles virus is far worse. Patients develop a painful rash with blisters that has been described as feeling like sharp little needles or a stinging pain from touching an open sore.

Sometimes, shingles can lead to long-term nerve pain, too. And, active shingles is contagious.

Even if you’ve had shingles, you should still get the vaccine – because patients can get it more than once.

Help for Couples Experiencing Infertility

Infertility is a unique medical diagnosis for doctors because it involves a couple rather than just an individual. For couples under age 35, infertility is defined as the inability to conceive after 12 months of unprotected intercourse. For couples over age 35, it’s six months.

In this WLTX interview inside Lexington Medical Center’s new patient care tower, Dr. Blake Chapman of Lexington Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, talks about diagnosing infertility and helping couples to welcome a baby.

According to Dr. Chapman, young, healthy, fertile couples only have a 15 to 20 percent chance of conceiving each menstrual cycle. After three months, approximately 50 percent of those couples would become pregnant. After 12 months, it jumps to 85 to 90 percent.

That means that approximately 10 to 15 percent of couples fall into the category of infertility and should see their health care provider.

About 1/3 of infertility is female factor infertility. Causes could be something a woman has been born with that’s making it difficult to conceive, a history of pelvic infections or surgery, or some medications she’s taking.

About 1/3 of infertility is male factor infertility. Causes could be a man has been born with something that’s making it difficult to conceive, his body doesn’t transport sperm correctly, or he’s had pelvic trauma or pelvic radiation.

The last 1/3 of infertility is undefined. That means doctors aren’t sure of the cause and help patients pursue other avenues to have a baby.

If you’re considering pregnancy, Dr. Chapman recommends seeing your physician for pre-conception counseling, which includes a look at your medical history and any medications you’re taking. This type of patient education plays an important role in optimizing chances of natural fertility.

Lexington Medical Center Welcomes South Carolina OB/GYN Associates

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to announce that South Carolina OB/GYN Associates has joined the hospital’s network of care as a Lexington Medical Center physician practice.

South Carolina OB/GYN Associates is home to nine highly skilled physicians who offer a wide range of obstetric and gynecological health services for women in all stages of life. The practice has taken care of women in the Midlands for more than 50 years.

The physicians are:
Courtney R. Brooks, MD, FACOG
Thomas P. Giudice, MD, FACOG
Robert P. Grumbach, MD, FACOG
David C. Holladay, MD, FACOG
Christopher T. Hutchinson, MD, FACOG
M. Tucker Lafitte III, MD, FACOG
Rebecca B. Ridenhour, MD, FACOG
Mark H. Salley, MD, FACOG
James W. Stands, MD, FACOG

Lexington Medical Center delivers more than 3,300 babies each year. The hospital’s new 545,000 square-foot patient care tower includes a spacious, state-of-the-art Labor and Delivery unit. Since the hospital opened in 1971, more than 100,000 babies have been born there. Lexington Medical Center looks forward to continuing its legacy of providing outstanding care to women in the Midlands for many years to come.

South Carolina OB/GYN Associates
2728 Sunset Boulevard
Suite 201
West Columbia, SC 29169
(803) 254 – 1300
www.SCOBGYN.com