Archive | Patient Stories RSS feed for this section

Operation Santa Claus

Santa & Mrs. Clause

Dennis and Marie Green have played Santa and Mrs. Claus for 21 years. The couple from Greenwood, South Carolina began the holiday tradition at Dennis’s annual Christmas party. His jolly beard and her twinkling smile reminded friends and co-workers of the holiday’s most celebrated duo.

The Greens began visiting churches and family-friendly establishments each holiday season to listen to Christmas wishes from children throughout the community.

In October, Green had bypass surgery at Lexington Medical Center after experiencing severe angina, a type of chest pain that is caused by reduced blood flow to the heart.

Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery and Lexington Medical Center’s cardiology team made sure Santa was healthy in time for Christmas.

“I was very impressed with the level of care I received from Dr. Travis, Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery and the nurses at Lexington Medical Center,” said Dennis Green, a.k.a. Santa Claus.

He was back to taking Christmas lists from children after just two weeks.

“I didn’t have to shave my beard for surgery, which is very important this time of year,” added Green.

Cardiac surgery is a powerful treatment that restores heart function and saves lives. It’s one of the most critical components of the complete heart and vascular program at Lexington Medical Center.

Merry Christmas.

Local woman’s cancer battle uncovers family link

FROM WIS TV

A Midlands woman’s fight against breast cancer led to a discovery that may save the lives of her sisters and daughters.

Click for Video: wistv.com – Columbia, South Carolina

Kelly, Kathryn and Ashley

Kelly, Kathryn and Ashley

 

Kathryn Robinson’s cancer battle started more than two years ago.  ”I was preparing to go to work, and while I was in the shower I just accidentally felt a lump in my breast,” said Robinson.

It had been less than two months since Robinson’s yearly mammogram, but she knew something wasn’t right. “I called the doctor and went in that afternoon,” said Robinson. “He sent me in for an ultrasound that next Monday.”

Just a few days after the ultrasound Robinson was diagnosed with breast cancer and life immediately changed for her and her family.

“When my mom was diagnosed and she talked about getting genetic testing done, that’s the first time I had ever heard of the gene,” said Robinson’s 24 year-old daughter, Ashley Lyons.

Robinson’s family quickly learned about the BRCA gene malformation. It’s hereditary and when present greatly increases the risk of breast and ovarian cancer. In the midst of chemo, Kathryn tested positive for the gene.

“I had eight rounds of chemotherapy, and I was scheduled to do radiation after that, but because I was positive with the BRCA2 gene, they did a bilateral mastectomy,” said Robinson.

Doctors at Lexington Medical Center recommended the mastectomy and a hysterectomy in hopes of eliminating Robinson’s future cancer risks. They also advised her family to get tested for the gene.

“I had one sister that wasn’t interested in getting tested and a younger sister that I can usually persuade to do just about anything… she went and got tested,” said Robinson.

As it turned out, Robinson’s sister Kelly Moore also tested positive for the gene malformation. “I feel like I’m the lucky one,” said Moore. “Kathryn helped to educate me, and I had all of her valuable information for what she had gone through.

Moore chose to have her ovaries removed as a preventive measure, and is now getting more frequent breast exams. For Robinson’s daughter Ashley, the decision was more difficult.

“At first, I did not want to know,” said Ashley. “I did not want to be tested.” But Ashley says her older sister talked her into being tested for the gene. While her older sister does not have the BRCA malformation, Ashley does.

“At first I was like how do you test positive and do nothing about it…so that was kind of hard in the beginning,” said Ashley.

But medical oncologist Dr. Steve Madden at Lexington Medical center says at Ashley’s young age it’s okay not to undergo preventive surgery as long as she’s pro-active. “As long as you’re aware, you’re going to be on top of anything and catch it much earlier if it develops at all,” added Dr. Madden.

Kathryn has been a survivor now for two years. Her family calls her a lifesaver. “She was very positive, and she inspired all of us to take a fighting approach to it,” said Moore.

Dr. Madden says doctors usually advise anyone diagnosed with breast cancer who is under the age of 50 to be tested for the gene. They also advise immediate family members of breast cancer patients to be tested, as well.

Click for the full video: WIS TV VIDEO

LMC Oncology Social Worker, Chris Gibson, featured in The State.

LMC’s Chris Gibson, oncology social worker, outpatient services at Lexington Medical Center is a source of strength to those in her well attended cancer support group. Read about Chris and her inspiring philosophy on career and life.

Chris Gibson

Photo via The State – Kim Foster-Tobin


By MINDY LUCAS — mlucas@thestate.com

LEXINGTON COUNTY, SC — It’s a Wednesday afternoon, and members of a cancer support group at Lexington Medical Center are gathered around a conference table talking about “chemo brain,” the mental fog patients often have after chemotherapy.

Suddenly one member quips he never had much of a brain to start with.

Everyone, including the cancer support group’s leader Chris Gibson, bursts into laughter.

It’s the kind of thing members say happens often at the meetings.

“I’ve been in here crying and I’ve been in here laughing,” says Jill Revis, who recently finished a round of chemotherapy to treat colon cancer.

The women say they wouldn’t have found each other had it not been for Gibson, a social worker in Lexington Medical’s oncology department who founded the group in 2003.

“Chris is the only reason I started coming to the meetings,” says Kathryn Ward, who has been in remission for more than five years. “I kept saying, ‘I don’t need support. I don’t need support.’ But then I realized, I did need support.”

Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2013/05/12/2768619/lexington-woman-finds-second-career.html#storylink=cpy

Screen Shot 2013-05-13 at 9.01.57 AM

Photo via The State, Kim Foster-Tobin