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Quinoa Shrimp Salad

Lexington Medical Center has begun to host a new diabetes support and wellness group called “D2 & Me” for type 2 diabetes patients and their caregivers. The meetings, which are open to the public, help diabetics manage the disease by offering helpful information, including healthy recipes. Here’s one from the class. It looks delicious, doesn’t it?

Courtesy: www.cookingandcooking.com

Courtesy: www.cookingandcooking.com

Try this healthy, delicious and light Quinoa Shrimp Salad. It can be served warm or cold.

Serves 5

Ingredients
1 cup red quinoa
2 cups water
1 cup (about 160 g) grape tomatoes, halved
1 garlic clove, minced
340 g shrimp, cooked, peeled and deveined
3/4 cup fresh parsley, chopped
2 celery stalks (about 1 1/4 cups), thinly sliced
3 tablespoons fresh basil, chopped
1/4 cup fresh lemon juice (you can add more, depends on your taste)
4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon lemon zest
salt & black pepper to taste

Preparation
In a small saucepan, bring water to a boil. Add quinoa and give it a quick stir. Cover the saucepan, reduce heat to low and simmer for 15-17 minutes, or until the quinoa is tender and the water has been absorbed. Remove from heat and let stand 5 minutes. Then fluff with a fork. Allow it to cool to room temperature.

Meanwhile, heat 2 tablespoons olive oil in a skillet over medium heat. Add garlic and sauté for 1 minute or until fragrant. Add the celery. Reduce heat to medium-low and cook uncovered for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.

In a small bowl, whisk together the lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil, lemon zest, pepper and salt. Set the dressing aside.

In a large bowl, combine the celery mixture, shrimps, grape tomatoes, parsley and basil. Stir in quinoa. Pour the dressing over the quinoa mixture and toss. Taste and adjust seasonings. Serve warm or cold.

Source: www.cookingandcooking.com

“D2 & Me” classes take place on the Lexington Medical Center hospital campus, at the hospital’s community medical center in Lexington, or off site for special events. Clinicians and experts who have special training in caring for people who have diabetes lead the classes and meetings. Our next classes are coming up!

December 9 & 17
Diabetic-Friendly Holidays

Laura Stepp, MA, RD/LD, CDE
December 9th class will be in the Lexington Medical Center hospital campus inside Lower Level Classroom 3 from 5:45 – 6:45 p.m.
December 17th class will be at Lexington Medical Center’s community medical center at 811 West Main Street in Lexington inside the first floor conference room from 5:45 – 6:45 p.m.
Free and open to public

Breakfast Perspective

by Morgan Robbins, RD, LD at LMC

Breakfast has been under ridicule lately that it may not be the most important meal of the day. Let’s get back to the basics: think of your body as being in a fasting state while you’re sleeping until the moment that you wake up (breaking the fast = breakfast, clever right?).

banana_2Eating an early meal soon after waking up will jump-start your metabolism and get your body ready for the day. Remember, FOOD is fuel; it’s what helps you get through the day. You get out what you put in, if you don’t put fuel in the tank or put poor quality fuel in, you’re not going to go very far (example: you skip breakfast or eat foods lacking in quality nutrition more than likely you’re going to be starving by lunch time and make poor choices). This will help put the meals and foods you choose into a new perspective.

breakfast9What to eat always seems to be the question. Too many people are choosing high fat, high cholesterol, high sodium breakfasts that are lacking the nutrition needed to give your body the energy it requires. I’m talking bacon, sausage, biscuits with gravy, chicken nuggets and hash. These are all foods to be consumed in moderation and preferably not as the meal you chose to give your body the fuel it needs to start your day.

Let’s compare a healthy breakfast with a not-so-healthy breakfast:

Whole wheat toast w/ 1 Tbsp peanut butter
½ cup blueberries
1 banana
Greek yogurt

411 calories
27 gm protein
8 gm fiber
22% calories from fat
3 mg cholesterol
287 mg sodium

Sausage biscuit
Grits

618 calories
14 gm protein
2 gm fiber
54% calories from fat
33 mg cholesterol
1,373 mg sodium

In addition to being the better choice, you’re getting whole grains, healthy fats and more vitamins and minerals with the healthy breakfast compared to the not so healthy breakfast. You’re also getting more food with the healthy breakfast – so enjoy!

When doing so in moderation, you can make all foods fit into a healthy diet. Moderation is the key. When planning or ordering your breakfast tomorrow, keep in mind this is the fuel your body will use to start your day off right!

Are You Getting Enough?

Are You Getting Enough?
By: Morgan Robbins RD, LD at LMC

September is fruit and vegetable month and what better time to re-evaluate your diet to ensure you’re getting enough fruits and vegetables. Ninety percent of adults and children do not meet their daily recommended fruit and vegetable intake.

Vegetables

Adults need 1-3 cups of fruits per day and 1½ -4 cups of vegetables per day. Everyone has different requirements, to find out what you need daily, visit the Fruit and Vegetable Calculator. When in doubt, fill up half of your plate with a combination of fruits and veggies!

fruit_4
Five Reasons to Add More Fruits and Vegetables to Your Diet:
5. Quick and easy snacks- Fruits and veggies serve as easy, portable and healthy snacks for all to enjoy.
4. Reduce risk for disease- Adequate intake can lower risk for chronic disease and other health aliments.
3. Fiber- Fruits and veggies are full of fiber which helps you feel full and keeps your digestive system in check.
2. Variety- Fruits and vegetables come in an endless amount of shapes, textures, flavors and colors, leaving you with plenty of options.
1. Vitamins and Minerals- Fruits and veggies are loaded with vitamins and minerals to keep your body energized and healthy.