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The Doctor Is In: Women and Heart Disease

From raising children to maintaining busy work schedules and keeping up with household chores, women’s lives are more hectic than ever. Women often put everyone else in their family first, but it’s important that they take time for their own health.

Dr. “Dee” Prastein, heart surgeon at Lexington Cardiovascular Surgery, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice, talks about women and heart disease, encouraging all of us to “Just Say Know.”

Prastein_Labcoat_Standing_ORWhat differences have you noticed between men and women with heart disease?
Women tend to delay things, living with heart disease longer and presenting later. We see women who go about their routine chores while having chest pain or chest discomfort, ignoring or dismissing it. Sometimes they live with symptoms until they become so tired that they physically can’t do anything. It’s only then that they see a doctor.

What do women tell you about why they didn’t see a doctor sooner?
They seem to be focused on everyone except them. They put their families first. We see wives encouraging their husbands to see a doctor, but women often live with symptoms until they can no longer hide them.

How can heart surgery be different for men and women?
Women do really well with heart surgery because they seem to tolerate pain better than men. Also, older patients often tolerate pain better than younger ones.

How does smoking affect our hearts?
Nicotine causes hardening of the blood vessels, making them more stiff and narrow. That hardening of the arteries makes blockages more apparent sooner. You could say nicotine is the opposite of nitroglycerin, which allows blood vessels to become bigger.

What about diabetes?
With diabetes, high levels of sugar in your bloodstream allow the buildup of plaque in every blood vessel in your body, including the arteries in your heart.

What message do you have for women about heart disease?
I want women to know that it’s not normal to have no energy or to have chest discomfort such as pain or burning. If you do, see your doctor. Women who smoke, have a family history of heart disease or have diabetes should be especially careful. Don’t ignore symptoms. We can treat them and prevent a major heart attack.

The DASH Diet: Good for Your Blood Pressure

By Laura Stepp RD,LD, CDE at LMC

High blood pressure (hypertension) and pre-hypertension are two conditions that can be controlled with diet. According to the Centers for Disease Control, it is estimated that about half of all Americans have at least one risk factor for heart disease. High blood pressure (140/90) or Pre-hypertension (120/80-139/89) is one of those risk factors.

shutterstock_200040200Making a few changes to your food choices can help to naturally lower your blood pressure. High blood pressure can go unnoticed therefore it is important to have your blood pressure checked annually.

The DASH diet: Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension is a well-researched and documented pattern of eating that has been shown to help lower blood pressure. The DASH diet is a plant-based diet high in potassium and fiber and lower in saturated fat and sodium. In addition to helping to lower blood pressure, the DASH diet has been shown to help people naturally lower cholesterol and for many obtain a healthy weight. The DASH diet is closely related to another very well researched diet: the Mediterranean diet. Both of these dietary lifestyles are based on increasing ones intake of whole foods such as whole grains, fruits, vegetables and nuts/seeds. Adopting the DASH diet lifestyle helps to increase the intake of vitamins and minerals (such as Calcium, Potassium and Magnesium) needed by the body to help maintain normal blood pressure, cholesterol levels, and weight.

A DASH diet based on 2000 calories per day (what the food labels are based on) consists of:
Whole Grains and whole grain products: Wheat, Barley, Rye, Oats, Quinoa, Corn
6-8 oz (1 oz = 1 slice of bread, 1 cup of cereal hot or cold, ½ c cooked grain)

Vegetables
4-5 (1/2 cup cook or 1 cup Raw = serving)

berries2Fruit
4-5 (small/medium, ½ cup cooked, 2/3 cup mixed raw = serving)

Low Fat Dairy
2-3 (8 oz milk, ½ cup plain yogurt, 1 oz cheese = serving)

Nuts, Seeds, Legumes (dried beans, black eyed peas, split peas, lentils)
4-5/week (1 oz nuts/seeds = ¼ cup; ½ cup cooked legumes)

Lean Meats: Fish/Poultry (skinless)
2 (for Women 3-4 oz = serving; Men 4-6oz = serving)

Fats & Sweets
Limited: keep small and in moderation, use liquid oils such as Canola or olive oil, use butter spreads with expeller pressed oils vs stick margarine. If used, limit butter and other high saturated fat foods. Desserts on special occasions vs. daily.

A fresh and simple recipe we tested (which received good reviews for both taste and simplicity):

chickpea-wraps.jpg_1_272×1_005_pixelsChickpea Wraps with Grapes and Walnuts

    1 can (15 oz.) chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained and rinsed
    2 cups seedless red grapes, halved
    1/2 cup finely chopped red onion
    1/2 cup coarsely chopped roasted walnuts
    1 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh basil
    1 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh rosemary
    1 Tbsp. finely chopped fresh thyme
    1/2 cup plain, low-fat Greek yogurt
    2 Tbsp. fresh lime juice
    1 tsp. Dijon mustard
    Freshly ground black pepper
    8 (8-inch) whole-wheat tortillas

    In large mixing bowl, gently mash chickpeas with potato masher just to break skins. Add all remaining ingredients except tortillas and gently combine.

    On bottom half of tortilla, spoon 1/2 cup mixture in broad line. Fold left and right sides toward center until almost touching. Fold bottom edge toward center. Roll wrap firmly upwards. Place toothpick 2 inches from each end. Slice wrap diagonally and place cut side up on plate or platter. Repeat. Serve immediately or cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.

    Makes 8 servings
    Per serving (2 halves): 367 calories, 10 g total fat (1 g saturated fat), 58 g carbohydrate,
    15 g protein, 10 g dietary fiber, 425 mg sodium (lower with low sodium beans & no added salt)

Take 5 for Heart Health: Eat Right!

LMC dietitian Donna Quirk, a regular contributor to our “Ask the Dietitian” blog posts, was a guest on WIS-TV last week with a delicious and healthy recipe for chocolate pudding that incorporates chia seeds. She also talked about the health benefits of flax and chia seeds, from antioxidants to fiber. Learn more in the link below.

And here’s the recipe for “Chocolate Chia Pudding.”

6 Tbsp chia seeds
1 1/2 cup Almond Milk
3 Tbsp Unsweetened Cocoa Powder
6 Tbsp Agave Nectar
1 1/2 tsp Vanilla Extract

Combine all ingredients, whisking together until cocoa powder absorbs. Refrigerate for four hours, or overnight.

The chia seeds will absorb the liquid from the mixture. The texture of the finished product will be similar to tapioca pudding. You can also put all ingredients in the food processor for a smoother dish, similar to a chocolate mousse.