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LMC Welcomes Dr. Nichole McDonald, OB/GYN

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to welcome Nichole McDonald, MD to the hospital’s network of care. Dr. McDonald will practice obstetrics and gynecology at Lexington Women’s Care, a Lexington Medical Center physician practice. She will be based out of the physician practice’s office in Irmo.

NIchole McDonald, MD

NIchole McDonald, MD

“Being an OB/GYN gives you an incredible opportunity to be a part of a woman’s life from her teenage years through childbearing and beyond,” Dr. McDonald said. “I think it’s important to educate patients so that they can make the best decisions about their health and be active participants in their care.”

A West Columbia native, Dr. McDonald has a special interest in adolescent and pediatric gynecology, contraception, prevention of sexually transmitted infections and laparoscopic surgery. She is a member of the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology, the American Medical Association and the American Society of Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology. Dr. McDonald is also a member of the American Association of Gynecologic Laparoscopists, where she received the “Special Resident in Minimally Invasive Gynecology” award.

Dr. McDonald is accepting new patients. Call (803) 936-8100 for an appointment.

Lexington Women’s Care offers a full range of women’s services from first exams to childbirth to menopause and beyond in three convenient locations in Irmo, Lexington and West Columbia.

LexingtonWomensCare.com

West Columbia
2728 Sunset Boulevard
Suite 201
West Columbia, SC 29169

Irmo
1 Wellness Boulevard
Suite 203
Irmo, SC 29063

Lexington
811 West Main Street
Suite 210
Lexington, SC 29072

The Flu Vaccine: Who Will You Do It For?

This time of year, it’s important to receive a flu vaccine. By becoming vaccinated, you protect yourself from getting sick and passing influenza to patients, co-workers, family members and others.

LMC is launching a flu vaccine campaign. Personalize a sign with the name of the person or persons for whom you get the flu vaccine. Then, ask someone to take a photo of you and your sign with a cell phone and post these pictures to Facebook or Instagram, or text the photo to your loved ones. Use hashtags #NotJustForYou! and #FluVaccine.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that anyone 6 months of age and older should be vaccinated annually as the first and most important step in protecting against this serious disease. Vaccination is especially important for health care workers and those who live with or care for people at high risk of flu complications, such as children younger than 2 years, adults older than 65 years and pregnant women.

Sometimes, people can be skeptical of the flu vaccine. In this news video from WIS-TV, LMC doctor Jeremy Crisp of Lexington Family Practice Northeast talks about that.

Meanwhile, take everyday preventive steps to reduce the spread of germs:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water or an alcohol-based hand rub.
• Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
• Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink fluids and eat healthy foods.
• Cough into your sleeve instead of your hands if you do not have a tissue.
• If you have flu-like symptoms, stay home for at least 24 hours after your fever is gone without taking fever-reducing medicine.
• While sick, limit contact with others as much as possible.

Are You At Risk: Lung Cancer Screenings

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to present its monthly physician lecture on Monday, September 22 at 6:00 p.m. inside the Lexington Medical Park 1 Auditorium on the hospital campus. This month’s topic is “Are You At Risk: Understanding Lung Cancer Screenings.” Myron Barwick, MD, FACS, of Lexington Surgical Associates will give the presentation. It’s free and open to the public.

Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death in the U.S. because only 15 percent of patients with lung cancer are diagnosed with early stage disease.

Lexington Medical Center offers a new lung cancer screening program to help early detection. Qualified screening patients should be between the ages of 55-74 and have a 30 pack-year smoking history. If the patient is a former smoker, he or she must have quit within the past 15 years. Or, patients should be age 50 or older and have a 20 pack-year smoking history with one additional risk factor. A pack-year is calculated by multiplying the number of packs of cigarettes smoked per day by the number of years the person has smoked. For example, 1 pack year is equal to smoking 1 pack per day for 1 year or 2 packs per day for a half year.

Dr. Barwick talked about lung cancer and the screening program on WLTX today. The segment is below.

Lexington Medical Center is pleased to present a monthly lecture series featuring physicians speaking out medical topics that are important to our community. For the calendar of future events, visit LexMed.com.